Positive Coaching: Building Character and Self-esteem Through Sports

Front Cover
Warde Publishers, Jan 1, 1995 - Sports & Recreation - 400 pages
2 Reviews
Coaching is more art than science, but coaches seldom have the time or training to develop their talents beyond the X's and O's. Creative Coaching provides coaches innovative and effective approaches and solutions to tough challenges. The kind of artistry that produces wins.

What sets Lynch's coaching method apart is his unique, collective approach. Coaches learn to teach, guide, and motivate in a more reciprocal relationship with athletes. Respect and authority are earned not by a title or by disciplinary measures but by a clear vision and effective communication that prompts athletes to exert maximum effort toward their shared goals and develop their own decision-making skills -- all of which has a direct performance pay-off.

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Review: Positive Coaching: Building Character and Self-Esteem Through Sports

User Review  - Laurie - Goodreads

Okay, so not necessarily the most spiritually or intellectually enlightening of texts. However, it is a great book for anyone engaged in coaching sports at any level. Read full review

Review: Positive Coaching: Building Character and Self-Esteem Through Sports

User Review  - Goodreads

Okay, so not necessarily the most spiritually or intellectually enlightening of texts. However, it is a great book for anyone engaged in coaching sports at any level. Read full review

About the author (1995)

(1906 - 1977) James Meyers Thompson was born in Anadarko, Oklahoma. He began writing fiction at a very young age, selling his first story to "True Detective" when he was only fourteen. Thompson eventually wrote twenty-nine novels, all but three of which were published as paperback originals. Thompson also wrote two screenplays (for the Stanley Kubrick films "The Killing" and "Paths of Glory"). An outstanding crime writer, the world of his fiction is rife with violence and corruption. In examining the underbelly of human experience and American society in particular, Thompson's work at its best is both philosophical and experimental. Several of his novels have been filmed by American and French directors, resulting in classic noir including The Killer Inside Me (1952), After Dark My Sweet (1955), and The Grifters (1963).

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