Islam and the Secular State

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Harvard University Press, 2008 - Law - 324 pages
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What should be the place of Shari'a - Islamic religious law - in predominantly Muslim societies of the world? In this book, a Muslim scholar and human rights activist envisions a positive and sustainable role for Shari'a, based on a profound rethinking of the relationship between religion and the secular state in all societies.
 

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Islam and the secular state: negotiating the future of Shari├Š┬╗a

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Muslim scholar (Emory Univ.) and human rights activist An-Na'im has written extensively on law and human rights in the Islamic world (e.g., Toward an Islamic Reformation: Civil Liberties, Human Rights ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction Why Muslims Need a Secular State
1
Islam the State and Politics in Historical Perspective
45
Constitutionalism Human Rights and Citizenship
84
India State Secularism and Communal Violence
140
Turkey Contradictions of Authoritarian Secularism
182
Indonesia Realities of Diversity and Prospects of Pluralism
223
Conclusion Negotiating the Future of Sharia
267
References
295
Index
311
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About the author (2008)

Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na‘im is Charles Howard Candler Professor of Law at Emory University.

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