When the Rain Sings: Poems by Young Native Americans

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Simon and Schuster, 1999 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 76 pages
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"The songs of the storm make me remember" These lines are from one of the thirty-seven remarkable poems by young Native American writers from throughout the United States, collected in this anthology. Their heartfelt and striking words are paired with photographs of artifacts from the collection of the Smithsonianıs National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) that help to illuminate and extend the poetry. Ranging in age from seven to seventeen, the young poets whose work appears in this volume were participants in a mentoring program for new Native writers conducted by the Wordcraft Circle of Native Writers and Storytellers. Most of the poems in this book were written in response to images from the NMAI collection showing objects from the writersı culture groups. The combination of the voices and the images provides a powerful look at Native American life and history that is both beautiful and memorable.
 

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When the Rain Sings: Poems by Young Native Americans

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Gr 4 Up-A collection of poems by Native Americans in grades 2-12. Most of these selections were written in response to images of Native artifacts or historical photographs. The young writers' personal ... Read full review

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The National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), the newest Smithsonian Institution museum, is dedicated to working in collaboration with the indigenous peoples of the Americas to protect and foster Native cultures throughout the Western Hemisphere. The museumıs publishing program seeks to augment awareness of Native American beliefs and lifeways, and to educate the public about the history and significance of Native cultures.

NMAI opened its George Gustav Heye Center in lower Manhattan in 1994. In 1998, the museumıs Cultural Resources Center, a state-of-the-art research and storage facility, opened in suburban Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C. The museum will open its primary site on the National Mall in Washington in 2002. Visit NMAI on the world wide web at www.si.edu/nmai.

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