Freedom to Learn

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Merrill, 1994 - Education - 406 pages
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This is the text that championed a revolutionary approach to education that changed the way we teach our children. Now, in the Third Edition, its challenging the status quo with twenty years of evidence that defies current thinking. Five exciting new chapters focus on issues of importance now and in the future - learning from children who love school; researching person-centered issues in education; developing the administrators role as a facilitator; building discipline and classroom management with the learner; and person-centered views of transforming schools. Freedom to Learn, Third Edition is written in the first person, with two goals in mind - to aid the development of the minds of children and young persons, and to encourage the kinds of adventurous enterprises being carried out daily by dedicated, caring teachers in creative classrooms and supportive schools throughout the nation. *Use of a first-person narrative-a technique pioneered by Carl Rogers in the first edition of Freedom to Learn-personalizes text coverage, and gives prospective teachers a real feel of communicating with an expert about what is really needed in the classroom. *Case studies and interviews illumina

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Contents

CHAPTER
3
Schools That Love Kids
11
Concluding Remarks
21
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Educated at the University of Wisconsin, Carl Rogers intended to become a Protestant minister, entering the Union Theological Seminary in 1924. When he realized that he was more interested in spirituality than religion, he left the seminary. While working on his Ph.D. at Columbia University, he began to question some of the accepted techniques of psychotherapy, especially in the area of therapist-patient relationships. According to Current Biography, "he is best known as the originator of the nondirective "client centered' theory of psychotherapy. This prescribes a person-to-person, rather than a doctor-patient relationship between therapist and client, and allows the client to control the course, pace, and length of his own treatment."Rogers incorporated many of the elements of this theory into the basic structure of encounter groups. The author of many books and articles, Rogers taught at several large universities for many years and conducted a private practice as a counseling psychologist. He received many professional awards in official recognition of his high achievements, most notably the presidency of the American Psychological Association (1946--47).

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