The Federation of the World

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Houghton, Miffin, 1899 - Arbitration (International law). - 162 pages
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Page 152 - whereof make every thinking being shudder in advance. To put an end to these incessant armaments, and to seek the means of warding off the calamities which are threatening the whole world, is the supreme duty to-day imposed upon all states. Filled with this idea, His Majesty has been pleased to command me to
Page 151 - labor and capital are mostly diverted from their natural application and are unproductively consumed. Hundreds of millions are devoted to acquiring terrible engines of destruction, which, though to-day regarded as the last work of science, are destined to-morrow to lose all their value in consequence of some fresh discovery in the same field. National culture, economic progress and the
Page 152 - is the supreme duty to-day imposed upon all states. Filled with this idea, His Majesty has been pleased to command me to propose to all the governments whose representatives you are, accredited to the imperial court, the assembling of a conference which shall occupy itself with this grave problem. This conference will be, by the
Page 7 - made of one every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth." The oneness of origin and descent of the various peoples of the globe is now established with practical certainty on purely scientific grounds.
Page 151 - themselves, powerful alliances. It is the better to guarantee peace that they have developed, in proportions hitherto unprecedented, their military forces and still continue to increase them, without shrinking from any sacrifice. Nevertheless, all these efforts have not yet been able to bring about the beneficent result
Page 4 - peace is a dream, and not even a beautiful dream, and war is a law of God's order in the world, by which the noblest virtues of man, courage and self-denial, loyalty and self-sacrifice, even to the point of death, are developed. Without war the world would deteriorate into materialism.
Page 150 - The humanitarian and magnanimous ideas of His Majesty the Emperor, my august master, have been won over to this view in the Conviction that this lofty aim is in conformity with the most essential interests and legitimate views of all the powers
Page 152 - wealth are either paralyzed or checked in development. Moreover, in proportion as the armaments of each power increase, they less and less fulfill the object the governments have set before themselves. The economic crisis, due in great part to the system of armaments a
Page 151 - Nevertheless, all these efforts have not yet been able to bring about the beneficent result desired, pacification. The financial charges, following the upward march, strike at the very root of public prosperity. The intellectual and physical strength of the nations' labor and capital are mostly diverted from their natural application and are unproductively consumed. Hundreds of millions are devoted to acquiring terrible engines of destruction, which, though to-day regarded as the last
Page 150 - with the most essential interests and legitimate views of all the powers ; and the imperial government thinks the present moment would be very favorable to seeking the means. International discussion is the most effectual means of insuring all peoples

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