Liberal Orthodoxy

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1914 - Religion - 313 pages
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Page 54 - To seek our Divinity merely in books and writings, is to seek the living among the dead. We do but in vain seek God many times in these, where His Truth too often is not so much enshrined as entombed. No. Intro, te quaere Deum, seek for God within thine own soul...
Page 138 - Dissertation is to analyse the component parts of the Christian scheme of doctrine, with reference to its bearings both on the character of God and on the character of man ; and to demonstrate, that its facts not only present an expressive exhibition of all the moral qualities which can be conceived to reside in the Divine mind, but also contain all those objects which have a natural tendency to excite and suggest in the human mind that combination of moral feelings which has been termed moral perfection.
Page 54 - To seek our divinity merely in books and writings, is to seek the living among the dead ; we do but in vain seek God many times in these, where His truth too often is not so much enshrined as entombed : no, intra te quaere Deum, seek for God within thine own soul ; He is best discerned, as Plotinus phraseth it, by an intellectual touch of Him :* we must 'see with our eyes, and hear with our ears, and our hands must handle the Word of life,' that I may express it in St John's words.
Page 138 - In the Bible, it assumes quite a different shape ; it is there subservient to the manifestation of the moral character of God. The doctrine of God's combined justice and mercy in the redemption of sinners, and of his continued spiritual watchfulness over the progress of truth through the world and in each particular heart, could not have been communicated without it, so as to have been distinctly and -vividly apprehended...
Page 148 - Hucheson and Ferguson. It was while reading, one day in the former, some of the various passages in which he asserts man's capacity for disinterested affection, and considers virtue as the sacrifice of private interests and the bearing of private evils for the public good, that there suddenly burst upon his mind that view of the dignity of human nature, which was ever after to 'uphold and cherish' him, and thenceforth to be 'the fountain light of all his day, the master light of all his seeing.
Page 31 - ... command, brings you indeed a potion, or rather a drench, which, for ought you know, may as well set on and increase, as remove the error ; but when he opens his authorities, when he makes you conceive his grounds and reasons, then, and not before, he cures your error.
Page 148 - It was while reading, one day, in the former, some of the various passages in which he asserts man's capacity for disinterested affection, and considers virtue as the sacrifice of private interests and the bearing of private evils for the public good, or as self-devotion to absolute, universal good, that there suddenly burst upon his mind that view of the dignity of human nature, which was ever after to "uphold and cherish " him, and thenceforth to be " the fountain light of all his day, the master...
Page 32 - For my part, I am certain that God hath given us our reason, to discern between truth and falsehood ; and he that makes not this use of it, but believes things he knows not why; I say, it is by chance that he believes the truth, and not by choice ; and that I cannot but fear that God will not accept of this sacrifice of fools.
Page 144 - The reasonableness of a religion seems to me to consist in there being a direct and natural connexion between a believing the doctrines which it inculcates, and a being formed by these to the character which it recommends. If the belief of the doctrines has no tendency to train the disciple in a more exact and more willing discharge of its moral obligations, there is evidently a very strong probability against the truth of that religion...
Page 56 - ... the more with it : it is not a pertinacious imagination of our names being enrolled in the book of life, or of the debt-books of heaven being crossed, or of Christ being ours, while we find Him not living within us, or of the washing away of our sins in His blood, while the foul and filthy stains thereof are deeply sunk in our own souls; it is not, I say, a pertinacious imagination of any of these that can make us the better...

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