The Web Between the Worlds

Front Cover
Baen Publishing Enterprises, 2001 - Fiction - 337 pages
6 Reviews
"WHAT SF SHOULD BE ALL ABOUT." -- Kliatt

Rob Merlin was the best engineer who had ever lived. That was why "The King of Space" had to have him for the most spectacular construction project ever -- even though Rob was a potentially fatal threat to his power...

Thus begins a breakthrough novel by the former President of the American Astronautical Society, about an idea whose time has come: a shimmering bridge between Earth and space that mankind will climb to the stars!

Sound like fantasy? The concept has been in the literature of physics for over three decades, but only a writer with the scientific background of a Sheffield or a Clarke could bring the idea to life.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RandyStafford - LibraryThing

As Charles Fort might have said, “It’s space elevator time when it’s space elevator time.” And 1979 was space elevator time in science fiction. Besides this novel, Arthur C. Clarke’s The Fountains of ... Read full review

Review: The Web Between the Worlds

User Review  - Anderdith - Goodreads

Good plot but to technical sometimes. Read full review

About the author (2001)

Author and scientist Charles Sheffield was born in Hull, England on June 25, 1935. He was the chief scientist of Earth Satellite Corporation and while there, wrote numerous technical papers and two non-fiction books entitled Earth Watch and Man on Earth. He won numerous awards for his science fiction works including the 1992 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for Brother to Dragons and the 1993 Nebula award and the 1994 Hugo award for Georgia on My Mind. He wrote numerous series including the Heritage Universe series, Jupiter series, Cold as Ice series, and Proteus series. He died of cancer on November 2, 2002.

Arthur C. Clarke was born in Minehead, Somerset, England, on December 16, 1917. During World War II, he served as a radar specialist in the RAF. His first published piece of fiction was Rescue Party and appeared in Astounding Science, May 1946. He graduated from King's College in London with honors in physics and mathematics, and worked in scientific research before turning his attention to writing fiction. His first book, Prelude to Space, was published in 1951. He is best known for his book 2001: A Space Odyssey, which was later turned into a highly successful and controversial film under the direction of Stanley Kubrick. His other works include Childhood's End, Rendezvous with Rama, The Garden of Rama, The Snows of Olympus, 2010: A Space Odyssey II, 2062: Odyssey III, and 3001: The Final Odyssey. During his lifetime, he received at least three Hugo Awards and two Nebula Awards. He died of heart failure on March 19, 2008 at the age of 90.

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