Gabriele D'Annunzio: Poet of Beauty and Decadence

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Chicago Literary Club, 1922 - 19 pages
 

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Page 8 - O falce di luna calante *) che brilli su l'acque deserte, o falce d'argento, qual messe di sogni ondeggia al tuo mite chiarore qua gił! Aneliti brevi di foglie, sospiri di fiori dal bosco esalano al mare: non canto non grido non suono pe "1 vasto silenzio va. Oppresso d'amor, di piacere, il popol de
Page 27 - CECIL H. GREEN LIBRARY STANFORD UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305.6004 (650) 723.1493 grncirc@sulmail.stanford.edu All books are subject to recall. DATE DUE...
Page 16 - bad master," a source of degeneration, I mean one who, gifted with the power to seduce men by the charm and wealth of his imagination, by his skill in weaving harmonious and captivating phrases, instead of urging himself toward heroism, and drawing toward it the souls which he influences, surrenders himself in his writings to all the seductions of the life of ease, uses his talent for...
Page 8 - Ephemeral breathing of foliage, Of flowers, of waves from the forest, Goes forth to the ocean; no cry and no singing, No sound through the infinite silences goes. Oppressed with its loves and its pleasures, The life of the world lies in slumber; O sickle declining, what harvest of visions Is waving down here, thy mild lustre...
Page 16 - ... his imagination, by his skill in weaving harmonious and captivating phrases, instead of urging himself toward heroism and drawing toward it the souls which he influences, surrenders himself in his writings to all the weaknesses of passion and all the seductions of the life of ease, uses his talent for the exaltation of mean pleasures and gross desires, and on that account becomes, for those whom he has enchanted, a teacher of weakness, egoism, cowardice, and cupidity.
Page 15 - D'Annunzio has genius, ample learning, extraordinary sensitiveness, artistic craftsmanship — what does he lack ? He lacks decorum, to be sure; yes, and more than decorum, what he most lacks is a spiritual norm, in short, a conscience.
Page 17 - It consists of a deliberate and unrestrained search for pleasure, which he considers the very best means to wisdom, and one that will reveal endless manifestations of beauty. This beauty he is impelled to record in artistic form.
Page 6 - D'Annunzio was still in school, a mere boy of sixteen, when he published his first poem, which, with characteristic audacity, he addressed to the King of Italy.

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