Washington: The Capital City, and Its Part in the History of the Nation, Volume 2

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J.B. Lippincott Company, 1901 - Washington (D.C.)
 

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Page 257 - When the rebel army was at Frederick I determined, as soon as it should be driven out of Maryland, to issue a proclamation of emancipation, such as I thought most likely to be useful. I said nothing to any one ; but I made the promise to myself and [hesitating a little] to my Maker. The rebel army is now driven out, and I am going to fulfill that promise.
Page 145 - Lewis Cass, of Michigan, secretary of state ; Howell Cobb, of Georgia, secretary of the treasury; John B. Floyd, of Virginia, secretary of war ; Isaac Toucey, of Connecticut, secretary of the navy ; Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, secretary of the interior; Aaron V. Brown, of Tennessee, postmaster-general, and Jeremiah S. Black, of Pennsylvania, attorneygeneral.
Page 107 - Why, if some Southern gentleman wishes to take the nurse who takes charge of his little baby, or the old woman who nursed him in childhood, and whom he called "Mammy...
Page 251 - I am profitably engaged in reading the Bible. Take all of this book upon reason that you can and the balance upon faith and you will live and die a better man.
Page 75 - God, that if by your legislation you seek to drive us from the territories of California and New Mexico, purchased by the common blood and treasure of the whole people, and to abolish slavery in this District, thereby attempting to fix a national degradation upon half the states of this Confederacy, I am for disunion...
Page 258 - I was satisfied that the public confidence was more fully possessed by any one of them than by me, and knew of any constitutional way in which he could be put in my place, he should have it. I would gladly yield it to him. But, though I believe that I have not so much of the confidence of the people as I had some time since, I do not know that, all things considered, any other person has more; and, however this may be, there is no way in which I can have any other man put where I am. I am here; I...
Page 191 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government, and to collect the duties and imposts ; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 257 - I have got you together to hear what I have written down. I do not wish your advice "about the main matter, for that I have determined for myself.
Page 283 - None need expect he would take any part in hanging or killing those men, even the worst of them.
Page 258 - One other observation I will make. I know very well that many others might, in this matter as in others, do better than I can ; and if I was satisfied that the public confidence was more fully possessed by any one of them than by me, and knew of any constitutional way in which he could be put in my place, he should have it. I would gladly yield it to him. But though I...

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