Ecological Scale

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Columbia University Press, 1998 - Science - 615 pages
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Identifying scales of measurement, analysis, and inference is fundamental to the ability to assess and predict patterns and processes in ecology. This book synthesizes a diverse, previously scattered literature on scale in ecology. Peterson and Parker have gathered contributions from scholars representing a wide range of disciplines, including soil science, plant ecology, animal ecology, and aquatic ecology.
 

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Contents

Homage to St Michael or Why Are There So Many Books
3
Pattern Process and the Analysis of Spatial Scales
17
Persuading the Family
35
A Hierarchical View of Habitat and Its Relationship
55
Paleoecological Perspectives on Ecological Scale
79
The IllDefined
105
Historical Contingency and Multiple Scales of Dynamics
171
Spatial Scaling and Animal Population Dynamics
193
Scale Movement
289
Scaling and Integration in Trees
309
Spatial Scales and
339
Study Design
369
Measuring Environmental Change
429
Managing Ecological Systems and Processes
459
Relationships of Scale to Policy and Decision Making
485
Dimensions of Scale in Ecology Resource Management
499

Scale Issues in FoodWeb
207
I1 Defining Ecologically Relevant Change in the Process
227
Applied Scaling Theory
253
Remote Sensing Applications in Ecosystem Analysis
271
References
523
Contributors
595
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About the author (1998)

Edward D. berkowitz is professor of history and public policy and public administration at George Washington University. He is the author of eight books and the editor of three collections. During the seventies he served as a staff member of the President's Commission for a National Agenda, helping President Carter plan for a second term that never came to be.

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