Spiritual Roots of Restorative Justice, The

Front Cover
Michael L. Hadley
SUNY Press - Religion - 264 pages
0 Reviews
This interdisciplinary study explores what major spiritual traditions say in text, tradition, and current practice about criminal justice in general and Restorative Justice in particular. It reflects the close collaboration of scholars and professionals engaged in multifaith reflection on the theory and practice of criminal law. A variety of traditions are explored: Aboriginal spirituality, Buddhism, Chinese religions, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Sikhism. Drawing on a wide range of literature and experience in the field of Restorative Justice and recognizing the ongoing interdisciplinary research into the complex relationships between religion and violence, the contributors clarify how faith-based principles of reconciliation, restoration, and healing might be implemented in pluralistic multicultural societies.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Restorative Justice and the Philosophical Theories
31
A Buddhist Perspective
81
The Spirit and Practice of Restorative Justice
99
the Rediscovery of Restorative Justice
119
Justice in Hinduism
143
Theory and Practice
161
Jewish Perspectives on Restorative Justice
181
Theory and Practice
199
Justice as Hope
217
Select Bibliography
225
Contibutors
241
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author

Michael L. Hadley is a Professor of Germanic Studies and a Fellow at the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society at the University of Victoria, Canada. He has published several books, including God’s Little Ships: A History of the Columbia Coast Mission.

Bibliographic information