Chartism

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Charles C. Little and James Brown, 1840 - Best books - 113 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
9
III
16
IV
24
V
36
VI
49
VII
63
VIII
69
IX
89
X
96

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Page 54 - rights of man,' this right of the ignorant man to be guided by the wiser, to be, gently or forcibly, held in the true course by him, is the indisputablest.
Page 21 - Any law, however well meant as a law, which has become a bounty on unthrift, idleness, bastardy and beer-drinking, must be put an end to. In all ways it needs, especially in these times, to be proclaimed aloud that for the idle man there is no place in this England of ours. He that will not work...
Page 15 - ... by thrift and industry, hope to rise to mastership; or is such hope cut off from him? How is he related to his employer; by bonds of friendliness and mutual help; or by hostility, opposition, and chains of mutual necessity alone? In a word, what degree of contentment can a human creature be supposed to enjoy in that position? With hunger preying on him, his contentment is likely to be small! But even with abundance, his discontent, his real misery may be great.
Page 31 - The time has come when the Irish population must either be improved a little, or else exterminated. Plausible management, adapted to this hollow outcry or to that, will no longer do : it must be management, grounded on sincerity and fact, to which the truth of things will respond — by an actual beginning of improvement to these wretched brother-men.
Page 9 - No man at bottom means injustice; it is always for some obscure distorted image of a right that he contends...
Page 49 - And yet that there is verily a ' rights of man' let no mortal doubt. An ideal of right does dwell in all men, in all arrangements, pactions and procedures of men; it is to this ideal of right, more and more developing itself as it is more and more approximated to, that human Society for ever tends and struggles.
Page 14 - What constitutes the well-being of a man ? Many things ; of which the wages he gets, and the bread he buys with them, are but one preliminary item. Grant, however, that the wages were the whole; that once knowing the wages and the price of bread, we know all; then what are the wages? Statistic Inquiry, in its present unguided condition, cannot tell.
Page 33 - That the condition of the lower multitude of English labourers approximates more and more to that of the Irish competing with them in all markets; that whatsoever labour, to which mere strength with little skill will suffice, is to be done, will be done not at the English price, but at an approximation to the Irish price : at a price superior as yet to the Irish, that is, superior to scarcity of third-rate potatoes for thirty weeks yearly ; superior, yet hourly, with the arrival of every new steamboat,...
Page 113 - Strand,' the exasperated Chartist editor who sells it you for three-pence. We have read Marcus ; but his sorrow is not divine. We hoped he would turn out to have been in sport : ah no, it is grim earnest with him; grim as very death. Marcus is not a demon author at all : he is a benefactor, of the species in his own kind ; has looked intensely on the world's woes, from a...
Page 26 - A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that Fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun.

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