The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man's Changing Vision of the Universe

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Penguin Books, Limited, 1989 - Philosophy - 623 pages
4 Reviews
An extraordinary history of humanity's changing vision of the universe. In this masterly synthesis, Arthur Koestler cuts through the sterile distinction between 'sciences' and 'humanities' to bring to life the whole history of cosmology from the Babylonians to Newton. He shows how the tragic split between science and religion arose and how, in particular, the modern world-view replaced the medieval world-view in the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century. He also provides vivid and judicious pen-portraits of a string of great scientists and makes clear the role that political bias and unconscious prejudice played in their creativity.

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User Review  - KidSisyphus - LibraryThing

Read this for a graduate course in rationalism. I was particularly impressed by the section dedicated to Kepler, who, I am reminded, essentially wrote the first piece of science fiction waaaay back ... Read full review

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One of the best and most informative books I have ever read. An excellent book. I borrowed it from a friend but now I have to buy it and own it myself. It worth reading it more than once.

Contents

Preface
9
Introduction
15
The Harmony of the Spheres
26
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Arthur Koestler (1905-1983) was an extraordinary polymath, writer, and political polemicist. His most famous works include the novels Darkness at Noon and Arrival and Departure; his autobiographical writings, including Spanish Testament and Scum of the Earth; and his visionary nonfiction, including The Ghost in the Machine, The Case of the Midwife Toad, and The Sleepwalkers.

Herbert Butterfield was an influencial historiographer born in 1900 in Yorkshire, England. A graduate of Peterhouse, University of Cambridge, he is best known for his 1931 work The Whig Interpretation of History. He died in 1979.

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