The Illustrated Horse Management

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J.B. Lippincott, 1906 - Animal culture - 548 pages
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Page 251 - many more pieces of iron curved, hollowed, raised, and indented than I have cared to enumerate. All, however, have failed to restore health to the hoof. Some by enforcing a change of position may for a time appear to mitigate the evil ; but none can in the long run cure the disorder under which the hoof evidently suffers.
Page 44 - Nature is a strict economist," and that "man has for ages labored to disarrange parts thus admirably adjusted. ... No injury, no wrong, no cruelty, can be conceived which barbarity has not inflicted on the most generous of man's many willing slaves." But although he has thus seen "the folly of contending against those organizations which govern the universe," he still thought that the employment of some sort of shoe might not lie open to this charge.
Page 15 - The mode of administering it, and minor operations. SHOEING. — Its origin, its uses, and its varieties. THE TEETH. — Their natural growth, and the abuses to which they are liable. FOOD. — The fittest time for feeding, and the kind of food which the horse naturally consumes. The evils which are occasioned by modern stables. The faults inseparable from stables. The so.called " incapacitating vices," which are the results of injury or of disease.
Page 521 - ... was placed before an empty manger, and left, tired and hungry, to its night's meditations on the evils of disobedience. The above narrative, of course, concludes by stating that the animal proved docile "forever afterward." The obvious intention of the above is to discourage the employment of force. The strongest man cannot physically contend against the weakest horse. Man's power reposes in better attributes than any which reside in thews and muscles. Reason, alone, should dictate and control...
Page 233 - TEETH.— Their natural growth, and the abuses to which they are liable. FOOD.— The fittest time for feeding, and the kind of food which the horse naturally consumes. THE EVILS which are occasioned by modern stables. THE FAULTS inseparable from most present erections which are used as stables. THE SO-CALLED "INCAPACITATING VICES," which are the results of injury or of disease.
Page 434 - for operation," because of its supposed ferocity. Yet I, a novice, had passed many an hour in its society, and assert I could not have desired a more gentle companion. We have often...
Page 16 - HORSE DEALERS. — Who they are: their mode of dealing: their profits: their morality, and their secrets. POINTS. — Their relative importance, and where to look for their development. BREEDING. — Its inconsistencies and its disappointments. BREAKING AND TRAINING.
Page 434 - Thus, between feeding, reading, examining and caressing, many an afternoon was most pleasantly whiled away. It was necessary to indulge in certain intimate familiarities. Sometimes to change the position of the animal, or to finger its lower extremities. When doing this, the author possessed no jockeyship to protect him, neither was he conscious that any protection was necessary. He used to shut himself up with the companion of his studies: and the hours thus spent he now remembers as among the very...
Page 148 - The engraving presents half the lower jaw of an animal of that age. Those organs which are of recent appearance will be recognized by their darker color, by their larger size, or by their differing in shape from the other members. These...
Page 434 - We have often," says Mr. Mayhew, " laid long together side by side ; or, as I reclined upon the straw reading, the head would rest upon my shoulder, while a full stream of fragrant warmth would salute my cheek. Still, such a creature, so open to advances, so grateful for little kindnesses, was a reputed savage!

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