Gödel's Proof

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Taylor & Francis, 2005 - Mathematics - 94 pages
5 Reviews

'Nagel and Newman accomplish the wondrous task of clarifying the argumentative outline of Kurt Godel's celebrated logic bomb.'– The Guardian

In 1931 the mathematical logician Kurt Godel published a revolutionary paper that challenged certain basic assumptions underpinning mathematics and logic. A colleague of physicist Albert Einstein, his theorem proved that mathematics was partly based on propositions not provable within the mathematical system. The importance of Godel's Proof rests upon its radical implications and has echoed throughout many fields, from maths to science to philosophy, computer design, artificial intelligence, even religion and psychology. While others such as Douglas Hofstadter and Roger Penrose have published bestsellers based on Godel’s theorem, this is the first book to present a readable explanation to both scholars and non-specialists alike. A gripping combination of science and accessibility, Godel’s Proofby Nagel and Newman is for both mathematicians and the idly curious, offering those with a taste for logic and philosophy the chance to satisfy their intellectual curiosity.

Kurt Godel(1906 – 1978) Born in Brunn, he was a colleague of physicist Albert Einstein and professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - palaverofbirds - LibraryThing

For a book that was supposed to simplify Godel's Proof it was exceptionally complex. No real thesis either; basically, the first 75% of the book is just setting up preliminaries and doesn't even deal ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - encephalical - LibraryThing

Left me wondering about more foundational items that were mentioned in passing such as 'primitive recursive truths' and the 'Correspondence Lemma'. The exposition seemed rushed at the end. Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Born in Czechoslovakia, Ernest Nagel emigrated to the United States and became a naturalized American citizen. In 1923 he graduated from the City College of New York, where he had studied under Morris Cohen, with whom he later collaborated to coauthor the highly successful textbook, An Introduction to Logic and Scientific Method (1934). Pursuing graduate studies at Columbia University, he received his Ph.D. in 1930. After a year of teaching at the City College of New York, he joined the faculty of Columbia University, where in 1955 he was named John Dewey Professor of Philosophy. In 1966 he joined the faculty of Rockefeller University. Nagel was one of the leaders in the movement of logical empiricism, conjoining Viennese positivism with indigenous American naturalism and pragmatism. In 1936 he published in the Journal of Philosophy the article "Impressions and Appraisals of Analytic Philosophy," one of the earliest sympathetic accounts of the works of Ludwig Wittgenstein, Moritz Schlick, and Rudolf Carnap intended for an American audience. Nagel was esteemed for his lucid exposition of the most recondite matters in logic, mathematics, and natural science, published in essays and book reviews for professional journals, scientific periodicals, and literary reviews. Two of his books, now out of print, consisted of collections of his articles, Sovereign Reason and Other Studies in the Philosophy of Science (1954) and Logic Without Metaphysics and Other Essays in the Philosophy of Science (1957). He also wrote a monograph, Principles of the Theory of Probability (1939) which appeared in the International Encyclopedia of Unified Science. In his major book-length work, The Structure of Science, Nagel directed his attention to the logic of scientific explanations.

James R. Newman was the author of "What is Science".

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