The Travels of Richard and John Lander, Into the Interior of Africa: For the Discovery of the Course ... of the Niger ... with a Prefatory Analysis of the Previous Travels of Park, Etc

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W. Wright, 1836 - Adams, Robert - 782 pages
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Page 107 - Whichever way I turned, nothing appeared but danger and difficulty. I saw myself in the midst of a vast wilderness, in the depth of the rainy season — naked and alone, surrounded by savage animals, and men still more savage.
Page 107 - ... though the whole plant was not larger than the top of one of my fingers, I could not contemplate the delicate conformation of its roots, leaves, and capsula, without admiration. Can that Being (thought I), who planted, watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part of the world, a thing which appears of so small importance, look with unconcern upon the situation and sufferings of creatures formed after his own image? — surely not ! Reflections like these, would not allow me to despair.
Page 94 - The air was sweet and plaintive, and the words, literally translated, were these. "The winds roared, and the rains fell. The poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree. He has no mother to bring him milk; no wife to grind his corn.
Page 107 - I saw myself in the midst of a vast wilderness, in the depth of the rainy season, naked and alone, surrounded by savage animals, and men still more savage. I was five hundred miles from the nearest European settlement. All these circumstances crowded at once to ray recollection, and I confess that my spirits began to fail me.
Page 408 - He then took my hand betwixt his, and looking me full in the face, while a tear stood glistening in his eye, said, in a low but deeply affecting tone, 'My dear Richard, if you had not been with me, I should have died long ago; I can only thank you, with my latest breath, for your kindness and attachment to me, and if I could have lived to return with you, you should have been placed beyond the reach of want; but God will reward you.
Page 104 - I therefore wrote the board full, from top to bottom, on both sides ; and my landlord, to be certain of having the whole force of the charm, washed the writing from the board into a calabash with a little water ; and, having said a few prayers over it, drank this powerful draught; after which, lest a single word should escape, he licked the board until it was quite dry.
Page 55 - ... particularly delighted with the umbrella, which he repeatedly furled and unfurled, to the great admiration of himself and his two attendants, who could not for some time comprehend the use of this wonderful machine. After this...
Page 66 - We had no sooner got into a dark and lonely part of the first wood, than he made a sign for us to stop, and taking hold of a hollow piece of bamboo, that hung as an amulet round his neck, whistled very loud, three times. I confess I was somewhat...
Page 291 - Bornou troops remained quite steady, without noise or confusion ; and a few horsemen, who were moving about in front giving directions, were the only persons out of the ranks. On the Arabs...
Page 107 - ... that Being (thought I) who planted, watered, and brought to perfection, in this obscure part of the world, a thing which appears of so small importance, look with unconcern upon the situation and sufferings of creatures formed after his own image ?—surely not! Reflections like these would not allow me to despair; I started up, and disregarding both hunger and fatigue, travelled forwards, assured that relief was at hand ; and I was not disappointed.

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