Freaks and marvels of plant life

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1881 - 463 pages
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Page 290 - In all places, then, and in all seasons, Flowers expand their light and soullike wings, Teaching us, by most persuasive reasons, How akin they are to human things. And with childlike, credulous affection We behold their tender buds expand ; Emblems of our own great resurrection Emblems of the bright and better land.
Page 21 - Then wherefore, wherefore were they made, All dyed with rainbow light ; All fashioned with supremest grace, Upspringing day and night ? Springing in valleys green and low, And on the mountains high, And in the silent wilderness, Where no man passes...
Page 445 - Though they smile in vain for what once was ours, They are love's last gift — bring ye flowers, pale flowers ! Bring flowers to the shrine where we kneel in prayer, They are nature's offering, their place is there ! They speak of hope to the fainting heart, With a voice of promise they come and part, They sleep in dust through the wintry hours, They break forth in glory — bring flowers, bright flowers ! THE CRUSADER'S RETURN. "Alas! the mother that him bare, If she had been in presence there,...
Page 172 - Here on its fragile stalk, to direct the traveller's journey Over the sea-like, pathless, limitless waste of the desert. Such in the soul of man is faith. The blossoms of passion...
Page 459 - And learn what habitants possess'd the place. They went and found a hospitable race; Not prone to ill, nor strange to foreign guest, They eat, they drink, and nature gives the feast; The trees around them, all their fruit produce; Lotos, the name; divine nectareous juice!
Page 350 - High overarched, and echoing walks between ; There oft the Indian herdsman, shunning heat, Shelters in cool, and tends his pasturing herds At loopholes cut through thickest shade...
Page 22 - Our outward life requires them not : Then wherefore had they birth ? To minister delight to man, To beautify the earth...
Page 141 - Tillandsia, that inhabits abundantly an arid rocky part of the mountain, at an elevation of about 5,000 feet above the level of the sea. Besides the ordinary method by seed, it propagates itself by runners, which it throws out from the base of the flower stem. This runner is always found directing itself towards the nearest Tillandsia, when it inserts its point into the water, and gives origin to a new plant, which in its turn sends out another shoot ; in this manner I have seen not less than six...
Page 219 - It has often been vaguely asserted that plants are distinguished from animals by not having the power / of movement. It should rather be said that plants acquire and display this power only when it is of some advantage to them ; this being of comparatively rare occurrence, as they are affixed to the ground, and food is brought to them by the air and rain.
Page 51 - I now inclose you an exact figure, with a specimen of its leaves and blossoms, shews, that nature may have some view towards its nourishment, in forming the upper joint of its leaf like a machine to catch food: upon the middle of this lies the bait for the unhappy insect that becomes its prey. Many minute red glands, that cover its inner...

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