Selections from Urbis Romae viri inlustres

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Ginn, 1895 - Latin language - 326 pages
 

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Page 126 - And in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's statua, Which all the while ran blood, Great Caesar fell.
Page 248 - n; 34, 27. ideo, adv., for that reason, on that account, 22, 19. Idus, Tduum, F., the Ides, middle of the month, the 15th of March, May, July, and October, and the 13th of the other months,
Page 87 - perfected whorl, the industrious shaft of the spindle. Still, as they span, as they span, was the tooth kept nipping and smoothing, Close at their feet, meanwhile, were woven baskets of wicker, Guarding the soft white balls of the wool resplendent within them.
Page 87 - They at a task eternal their hands religiously plying, Held in the left on high, with wool enfolded, a distaff, FIG. 8. Delicate fibres wherefrom, drawn down, were shaped by the right hand, Shaped by fingers up-turned — but the down-turned thumb set a-whirling, Poised
Page 101 - p. 24, 1. 7. 19. Appius Claudius: one of the greatest of the noble Claudian gens. He built the great Appian aqueduct, and began the famous Appian Way, which runs from Rome to Capua ; he was no less distinguished as a soldier, and was the earliest Roman writer in prose and verse whose name has come down to us.
Page 112 - in honor of Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva. To the Romans it was the symbol of the strength and stability of the state. When Horace wished to declare his immortality he said : " Ever new My after fame shall grow while pontiffs climb, With silent maids, the Capitolian height.
Page 46 - ferre, quod eum non posset audire. At Ule, "Tu vero," inquit, "potes, nee committam ut dolor corporis efficiat ut frustra tantus vir ad me
Page 126 - p. 51, 1. 25.— graphic : usually called stilus ; v. fig. 21. 21. confossus est: " Then burst his mighty heart j And in his mantle muffling up his face, Even at the base of Pompey's statua, Which all the while ran blood, Great Caesar fell.
Page 82 - Ere yet you light your altars, spread A purple covering o'er your head, Lest sudden bursting on your sight Some hostile presence mar the rite. Thus worship you, and thus your train, And sons unborn the rite retain.
Page 97 - had been sent for. 29. iugum : this was formed by two spears stuck in the ground, with another fastened transversely over their tops. To pass under the yoke was a disgrace

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