The Philosophy of Peter Abelard

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 23, 1999 - History - 396 pages
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This book offers a major reassessment of the philosophy of Peter Abelard (1079-1142) which shows that he was a far more constructive and wider-ranging thinker than has usually been supposed. It combines detailed historical discussion, based on published and manuscript sources, with philosophical analysis which aims to make clear Abelard's central arguments about the nature of things, language and the mind, and about morality. Although the book concentrates on these philosophical questions, it places them within their theological and wider intellectual context.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Part I
5
A life
7
Teaching and writings on logic
36
Abelards theological project
54
The letters of Abelard and Heloise
82
Abelards logic and his theology
94
Paart II
97
Part III
211
Introduction
213
Ethics Gods power and his wisdom
216
Gods goodness theodicy and the meaning of good
233
Act intention and consent
251
Contempt law and conscience
265
Virtue love and merit
282
Love selflessness and Heloise
298

Introduction
99
Logic philosophy and exegesis
101
Substance differentiae and accidents
117
Forms and language
138
Perception and knowledge
162
Universals
174
Dicta nonthings and the limits of Abelards ontology
202
Ethics society and practice
304
Abelards theological doctrines and his philosophical ethics
324
General conclusion
332
Abelard as a critical thinker
340
Select bibliography
350
Index
362
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