History of the Concept of Time: Prolegomena

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Indiana University Press, 1992 - Philosophy - 329 pages
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Heidegger's lecture course at the University of Marburg in the summer of 1925, an early version of Being and Time (1927), offers a unique glimpse into the motivations that prompted the writing of this great philosopher's master work and the presuppositions that gave shape to it. The book embarks upon a provisional description of what Heidegger calls "Dasein," the field in which both being and time become manifest. Heidegger analyzes Dasein in its everydayness in a deepening sequence of terms: being-in-the-world, worldhood, and care as the being of Dasein. The course ends by sketching the themes of death and conscience and their relevance to an ontology that makes the phenomenon of time central. Theodore Kisiel's outstanding translation premits English-speaking readers to appreciate the central importance of this text in the development of Heidegger's thought.

 

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Contents

Prolegomena to a phenomenology of history and nature under
5
Chapter One Emergence and Initial Breakthrough
13
Chapter Two The Fundamental Discoveries of Phenomenology
27
6 Categorial intuition
47
The original sense of the apriori
72
9 Clarification of the name phenomenology
80
c Correcting a few typical misunderstandings
88
Chapter Three The Early Development of Phenomenological
90
21 Worldhood of the world
167
23 Positive exposition of the basic structure of the worldhood of
185
3 Sense of the structure of encounter belonging to world
201
8 Beingintheworld as concerned and understanding
209
25 Spatiality of the world
223
26 Thewhoof beingintheworld
236
29 Falling as a basic movement of Dasein
272
30 The structure of uncanniness
283

critical
102
12 Exposition of the neglect of the question of the being of
108
13 Exposition of the neglect of the question of the sense of being itself
114
FIRST DIVISION
135
Chapter Two Elaboration of the Question of Being in Terms
143
Chapter Three The Most Immediate Explication of Dasein
151
31 Care as the being of Dasein
293
SECOND DIVISION
305
34 Phenomenological interpretation of death as a phenomenon
312
35 The phenomenon of willing to have a conscience and of being
318
EDITORS EPILOGUE
321
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Richard Coyne
Limited preview - 2007
Cornucopia Limited
Richard Coyne
Limited preview - 2007
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About the author (1992)

Theodore Kisiel, Professor of Philosophy at Northern Illinois University, is co-author of Phenomenology and the Natural Sciences and translator of Heidegger and the Tradition.

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