The General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation, Particularly the British and Irish, from the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time, Volume 27

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Nichols, 1816 - Biography
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Page 447 - Now was excited his delight in rural pleasures, and his ambition of rural elegance : he began from this time to point his prospects, to diversify his surface, to entangle his walks, and to wind his waters ; which he did with such judgment and such fancy, as made his little domain the envy of the great, and the admiration of the .skilful ; a place to be visited by travellers, and copied by designers.
Page 48 - An act for the further security of his Majesty's person and the succession of the crown in the Protestant line, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and all other pretenders, and their open and secret abettors...
Page 284 - Sathan are most certainly practised, and that the instruments thereof merits most severely to be punished : against the damnable opinions of two principally in our age, whereof the one called Scot, an Englishman, is not ashamed in public print to deny that there can be such a thing as witchcraft ; and so maintains the old error of the Sadducees in denying of spirits.
Page 387 - We have not reprinted the Sonnets, &c. of Shakspeare, because the strongest act of parliament that could be framed would fail to compel readers into their service...
Page 490 - Shower's Cases in Parliament Resolved and Adjudged upon Petitions and Writs of Error. Fourth Edition. Containing additional cases not hitherto reported. Revised and Edited by RICHARD LOVELAND LOVELAND, of the Inner Temple, Barrister-at-Law; Editor of " Kelyng's Crown Cases," and "Hall's Essay on the Rights of the Crown in the Seashore.
Page 442 - What woful stuff this madrigal would be In some starved hackney sonneteer or me ! But let a lord once own the happy lines, How the wit brightens ! how the style refines ! Before his sacred name flies every fault, And each exalted stanza teems with thought.
Page 330 - ... his humanity, courtesy, and affability was such, that he would have been thought to have been bred in the best courts, but that his good nature, charity, and delight in doing good, and in communicating all he knew, exceeded that breeding.
Page 372 - ... he should conceal his plan of life, or place of residence, from those who, if he found himself distressed, could not fail to afford him such supplies as would have set him above the necessity of holding horses for subsistence." Mr. Malone has remarked, in his " attempt to ascertain the order in which the Plays of Shakspeare were written...
Page 411 - Remarks on the Uses of the Definitive Article in the Greek Text of the New Testament.

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