The Winning of Barbara Worth

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Book Supply Company, 1911 - American fiction - 511 pages
A young man comes West to "Barbara's Desert" to set up an irrigation system there and finds himself in the middle of a fight between the corporation that sent him and Barbara's father, Jefferson Worth.
 

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Page 86 - But the Desert waited, silent and hot and fierce in its desolation, holding its treasures under the seal of death against the coming of the strong ones...
Page 82 - IX THE ARBITERS She stood before him in all the beautiful strength of her young •womanhood. He was really a fine looking young man with the appearance of being exceptionally well-bred and well~kept> Indeed the most casual of observers would not have hesitated to pronounce him a thoroughbred and a good individual of the best type that the race has produced. . . . — Barbara, he cried, don't...
Page 508 - Winning of Barbara Worth, Harold Bell Wright displayed the view for us: There was more in Barbara's desert now than pictures woven magically in the air. There were beautiful scenes of farms with houses and barns and fences and stacks, with cattle and horses in pastures, and fields of growing grain, the dark green of alfalfa, with threads and lines and spots of water that . . . shone in the distance like gleaming silver.
Page 6 - Give fools their gold, and knaves their power; Let fortune's bubbles rise and fall; Who sows a field, or trains a flower, Or plants a tree is more than all. "For he who blesses most is blest; And God and man shall own his worth Who toils to leave as his bequest An added beauty to the earth.
Page 153 - He saw first, following the nearly finished work of the engineers, an army of men beginning at the river and pushing out into the desert with their canals, bringing with them the life-giving water. Soon, with the coming of the water, would begin the coming of the settlers. Hummocks would be leveled, washes and arroyos filled, ditches would be made to the company canals, and in place of the thin growth of gray-green desert vegetation with the ragged patches of dun earth...
Page 86 - All were strong, clean-cut, vigorous specimens of intelligent, healthy manhood, for in all the professions, not excepting the army and navy, there can be found no finer body of men than our civil engineers.
Page 395 - ... of environmental management. Yet the overwhelming sentiment in the valley was against letting the Colorado River become Rio Harriman. Big capital, the valley felt, was as much to be feared as big nature. Harold Wright reflected that local concern when he grimly described "the methods of capital" as "impersonal, inhuman — the methods of a force governed by laws as fixed as the laws of nature, neither cruel nor kind; inconsiderate of man's misery or happiness, his life or death; using man for...
Page 243 - ... has a deep desire to be a cultivated Christian lady. Before her marriage she achieves this goal under the Shepherd's tutelage. Even the free and easy Barbara Worth has a fundamental substructure of instinctive feminine modesty. Her first meeting with the man she will eventually marry goes like this: It was no flimsy, two-fingered ceremony, but a whole-hearted, whole-handed grip that made the man's blood move more quickly. Unconsciously, as he felt the warm strength in the touch of the girl's...
Page 154 - ... gray-green desert vegetation with the ragged patches of dun earth would come great fields of luxuriant alfalfa, billowing acres of grain, with miles upon miles of orchards, vineyards and groves. The fierce desert life would give way to the herds and flocks and the home life of the farmer. The railroad would stretch its steel strength into this new world; towns and cities would come to be where now was only solitude and desolation; and out from this world-old treasure house vast wealth would pour...

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