Memories of the campaign of Santiago. June 6, 1898-Aug. 18, 1898

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Press of the Mysell-Rollins Co., 1899 - History - 60 pages
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Page 52 - Your splendid command has endured not only the hardships and sacrifices incident to campaign and battle, but in stress of heat and weather has triumphed over obstacles which would have overcome men less brave and determined. One and all have displayed the most conspicuous gallantry and earned the gratitude of the nation.
Page 29 - Grimes's battery moved on the afternoon of the 30th, with orders to take position thereon early the next morning, and at the proper time prepare the way for the advance of Wheeler and Kent on San Juan Hill. The attack at this point was to be delayed until Lawton's guns were heard at El Caney and his infantry fire showed he had become well engaged.
Page 59 - You continued to ad vanee skillfully and bravely, directed by the officers in immediate command, halting and delivering such a cool and well-directed fire that the enemy was compelled to wave the white flag in token of surrender. " 'Seldom have troops been called upon to face a severer fire and never have they acquitted themselves better. " 'The regimental reserve was called upon to try its nerve by lying quiet under a galling fire without returning it, where men were killed and wounded.
Page 52 - The President of the United States sends to you and your brave army the profound thanks of the American people for the brilliant achievements at Santiago, resulting in the surrender of the city and all of the Spanish troops and territory under General Toral. Your splendid command has endured not only the hardships and sacrifices incident to campaign and battle, but in stress of heat and weather has triumphed over obstacles which would have overcome men less brave and determined.
Page 52 - Santiago, Playa: The President of the United States sends to you and your brave army the profound thanks of the American people for the brilliant achievements at Santiago, resulting in the surrender of the city and all of the Spanish troops and territory under General Toral. Your splendid command has endured not only the hardships and sacrifices incident to campaign and battle, but in...
Page 29 - Battery, was ordered to move out during the afternoon toward El Caney, to begin the attack there early the next morning. After carrying El Caney, Lawton was to move by the Caney road toward Santiago and take position on the right of the line. Wheeler's Division of dismounted cavalry and Kent's Division of infantry were directed on the Santiago road, the head of the column resting near El Pozo, toward which heights Grimes...
Page 25 - The moment General Lawton and the commander of his leading brigade, General Chaffee, heard the noise of my engagement, they promptly struck camp and marched to the front; but as the enemy broke and was in full retreat in a little more than an hour, they did not reach me until some time after the action was over.
Page 35 - The Spaniards are using smokeless powder, and being under cover, we cannot locate them. A few yards to our left are high weeds, a few paces to the right thick underbrush and trees, a short distance to the front, a veritable jungle — all, for more than we know, alive with Spaniards. The bullets, missives of death from sources unknown, are raining into our very faces. A soldier comes running up, and cries out, "Lieutenant, we're shooting our own men...
Page 27 - Lawton's division, assisted by Capron's light battery, was ordered to move out during the afternoon toward El Caney, to begin the attack there early the next morning. After carrying El Caney, Lawton was to move by the Caney road toward Santiago and take position on the right of the line. Wheeler's division of dismounted cavalry and Kent's division of infantry were directed on the Santiago road, the...
Page 59 - ... themselves better. The regimental reserve was called upon to try its nerve, by lying quiet under a galling fire, without the privilege of returning it, where men were killed and wounded. This is a test of nerve which the firing line cannot realize, and requires the highest qualities of bravery and endurance.

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