Revision of Fossil Sequoia and Taxodium in Western North America Based on the Recent Discovery of Metasequoia: Transactions, APS

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American Philosophical Society, Jan 1, 2008 - 263 pages
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The recently discovered redwood of China, ¿Metasequoia glyptostroboides¿ Hu & Cheng, shows close relationship to two North American trees, the coast redwood, ¿Sequoia sempervirens¿ Endlicher of the western U.S., & the swamp cypress, ¿Taxodium distichum¿ Richard of the Southeastern U.S. Foliage & cones of these living trees provide characters by which the three genera may be readily distinguished. But for nearly a century there has been confusion in the recognition of fossil specimens. The author is now able to distinguish the fossil foliage & cones of all three genera, & to assign to Metasequoia many specimens which have previously been identified as Sequoia & Taxodium. Illustrations.
 

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Contents

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Page 236 - Recent determinations of fossil plants from Kentucky, Louisiana, Oregon, California, Alaska, Greenland, etc., with descriptions of new species.
Page 196 - ... the western base of the Sierra Nevada and the Mississippi there are, I believe no Tertiary beds not of this character, and the larger part of the great central plateau has never been covered with Tertiary or Drift sediments, but has, since the close of the Cretaceous epoch, been as now, dry land. The facts which I have enumerated seem to indicate that over this ancient land the isothermal lines were curved much as now, and that during the Tertiary ages, there was perhaps as great a difference...
Page 234 - The succession and distribution of Cenozoic floras around the northern Pacific Basin.
Page 236 - New Species of Fossil Plants, from the Anthracite and Bituminous Coal Fields of Pennsylvania; collected and described by Leo Lesquereux, with Introductory Observations by Henry l)nrwin Rogers.
Page 190 - I beliere, will assist in determining the age of tertiary deposits in Europe, more than any minute comparisons of species. Thus it is useless to seek in the Arctic regions for eocene floras, as we know them in our latitudes, for during the tertiary period, the climatic conditions of the earth did not permit their growth there. Arctic fossil floras of temperate and therefore...
Page 190 - Eocene floras, as we know them in our latitudes, for during the Tertiary period the climatic conditions of the earth did not permit their growth there. Arctic fossil floras of temperate, and therefore Miocene aspect, are in all probability of Eocene age, and what has been...
Page 236 - Harden, 1870 and 1871. II. Remarks on the Cretaceous species described above. III. Tertiary flora of North America. US Geol. and Geog. Survey Terr. Ann. Kept. 1871 [1872], pp. 283-318. Enumeration and description of fossil plants from the western Tertiary formations. Descriptions of species of fossil plants from the Cretaceous of Kansas. US Geol. and Geog. Survey Terr. Ann. Kept. 1872 [1873], pp. 371-427. Botanical paleontology of the Tertiary formations of the Rocky Mountains. US Geol. and Geog....
Page 211 - I have stated on several occasions,* the status of this form is at present unsatisfactory. In seeking for affinities for these Oregon specimens I have compared most of the figures of conifers given by Heer in his Flora Fossilis Arctica and other publications, and I am forced to the conclusion that there has been more or less confusion in dealing with these forms.
Page 200 - Notes on the later extinct florae of North America, with descriptions of some new species of fossil plants from the Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. New York Lyceum Nat. Hist., Annals, vol. 9, pp. 1-76, 1870. On the flora and fauna of the Miocene Tertiary beds of Oregon and Idaho.
Page 235 - A review of the fossil flora of Alaska, with descriptions of new species. US Nat. Mus., Proc., vol.

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