Plutarch's Lives: Marcus Crassus.-Sertorius.-Eumenes.-Agesilaus.-Pompeius

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Dent, 1899 - Biography
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Page 140 - ... to kill him. Wherefore to prevent this, he made as though he had occasion to occupy money, and so borrowed a great sum of them...
Page 48 - Parthians got up the sand-hill, and fighting with them thrust them through with their speares and pikes, and took but five hundred prisoners. After that, they struck off Publius Crassus head, and thereupon returned straight to set upon his father, Crassus, who was then in this state. ' Crassus, the father, after he had willed his son to charge the enemies, and that one brought him word he had broken them, and pursued the chase ; and perceiving also that they that remained -in their great battell,...
Page 42 - Parthians straight threw the clothes and coverings from therh that hid their armour, and then shewed their bright helmets and curaces of Margian tempered steel, that glared like fire, and their horses barbed with steel and copper. And Surena also, general of the Parthians, who was as goodly a personage, and as valiant, as any other in all his host, though his beauty somewhat effeminate, in judgement...
Page 14 - Of these the bondmen cut the strongest strips, and made thereof ladders, like to ship-ladders, of ropes, of such a length and so strong that they reached from the top of the hill even to the very bottom : upon those they all came safely down, saving one that tarried above to throw down their armour after them, who afterwards by the same ladder saved himself last of all. The Romans mistrusting no such matter, these bondmen compassed the hill round, assailed them behind, and put them in such a fear,...
Page 45 - Whereupon they stayed, thinking that the enemies perceiving they were so few, would come and fight with them hand to hand. Howbeit they set out against them their men at arms with their barbed horse, and made their light horsemen wheel round about them, keeping no order at all: who galloping up and down the plain, whirled up the sand hills from the bottom with their horse feet, which raised such a wonderful dust, that the Romans could scarce see or speak one to another. For they being shut up into...
Page 141 - Peucestas, having feasted them in the kingdom of Persia, and given every soldier a mutton to sacrifice, thought he had won great favour and credit among them. North, Plutarch's Lives, p. 505. A starved mutton's carcass would better fit their palates. B. Jonson, The Sad Shepherd, Act i. Sc. z. N. NAMELY. Now only designates ; but, like the German ' namentlich,' once designated as first and chief, as above all.
Page 332 - O friend, what art thou that preparest the funerals of Pompey the Great ? Philip answered, That he was a bondman of his enfranchised. Well, said he, thou shalt not have all this honour alone, I pray thee yet let me accompany thee in so devout a deed, that I may not altogether repent me to have dwelt so long in a strange country, where I have abidden such misery and trouble : but that to...
Page 219 - NOTES ON THE APPEARANCE OF POMPEY PORTRAITS exist of Cneius Pompeius Magnus. The most important of these is a marble bust at Copenhagen. Several likenesses are to be found on the gold and silver coins struck by his son, Sextus, in Spain. Plutarch says of him that, "being come to man's state, there appeared in his gesture and behaviour a grave and princely majesty. His hair also stood a little upright, and the cast and soft moving of his eyes had a certain resemblance (as they said) of the statues...
Page 333 - ... Egyptian. Was killed by Arsinoe (Ptolemy's sister) and the eunuch Ganymed in the year after Pompey's murder. ON THE HOUSE OF POMPEY, AFTER THE MURDER Cornelia. After seeing her husband killed, fled to Cyrene, and thence to Rome, where, in time, Pompey's ashes were brought to her. She is said to have buried them "in a town of hers by the city of Alba,
Page 14 - Romans besieged them in their fort, situate upon a hill that had a very steep and narrow ascent to it, and kept the passage up to them : all the rest of the ground round about it was nothing but high rocks hanging over, and upon them great store of wild vines. Of these the bondmen cut the strongest strips, and made thereof ladders, like to ship-ladders, of ropes, of such a length and so strong that they reached from the top of the hill even to the very bottom : upon those they all came safely down,...

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