Encyclopedia of Contemporary Russian Culture

Front Cover
Smorodinskaya
Routledge, Oct 28, 2013 - History - 727 pages

This addition to the highly successful Contemporary Cultures series covers the period from period 1953, with the death of Stalin, to the present day. Both ‘Russian’ and ‘Culture’ are defined broadly. ‘Russian’ refers to the Soviet Union until 1991 and the Russian Federation after 1991. Given the diversity of the Federation in its ethnic composition and regional characteristics, questions of national, regional, and ethnic identity are given special attention. There is also coverage of Russian-speaking immigrant communities. ‘Culture’ embraces all aspects of culture and lifestyle, high and popular, artistic and material: art, fashion, literature, music, cooking, transport, politics and economics, film, crime – all, and much else, are covered, in order to give a full picture of the Russian way of life and experience throughout the extraordinary changes undergone since the middle of the twentieth century.

The Encyclopedia of Contemporary Russian Culture is an unbeatable resource on recent and contemporary Russian culture and history for students, teachers and researchers across the disciplines. Apart from academic libraries, the book will also be a valuable acquisition for public libraries.

Entries include cross-references and the larger ones carry short bibliographies. There is a full index.

 

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Encyclopedia of contemporary Russian culture

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Smorodinskaya (Russian, Middlebury Coll.), Karen Evans-Romaine (Russian, Ohio Univ.), and Helena Goscilo (Slavic languages, Univ. of Pittsburgh) have edited the work of several dozen contributors to ... Read full review

Contents

Consultant editors
vi
List of contributors
vii
List of entries AZ
xii
Thematic list of entries
xlix
Acknowledgements
lxii
Introduction
lxiii
Entries AZ
1
Index
693
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Edited by Karen Evans-Romaine, Associate Professor of Russian, Ohio University; Helena Goscilo, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburg; Tatiana Smorodinskaya, Assistant Professor of Russian Language, Culture and Literature, Midddlebury College, Vermont

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