Letters from Flushing: Containing an Account of the Expedition to Walcheren, Beveland, and the Mouth of the Scheldt, Under the Command of the Earl of Chatham; to which is Added, a Topographical and Statistical Account of the Islands of Walcheren and Beveland

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R. Phillips, 1809 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814 - 288 pages
 

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Page 258 - ... lest he might by a roughness and barbarity of style, too frequent among men of great learning, disappoint his own intentions, and make his labours less useful, he did not neglect the politer arts of eloquence and poetry. Thus was his learning at once various and exact, profound and agreeable. But his knowledge, however uncommon, holds, in his character, but the second place ; his virtue was yet much more uncommon than his learning. He was an admirable example of temperance, fortitude, humility,...
Page 258 - So far was this man from being made impious by philosophy, or vain by knowledge, or by virtue, that he ascribed all his abilities to the bounty, and all his goodness to the grace of God. May his example extend its influence to his admirers and followers! May those who study his writings imitate his life ! and those who endeavour after his knowledge, aspire likewise to his piety...
Page 22 - This kind of hoaxing may serve you as a specimen of the sea-jests practised upon us. A military man should be sworn to the patient endurance of hardships...
Page 257 - Boerhaave, a man formed by nature for great designs, and guided by religion in the exertion of his abilities. He was of a robust and athletic constitution of body, so hardened by early severities, and wholesome fatigue, that he was insensible of any sharpness of air, or inclemency of weather. He was tall, and remarkable for extraordinary strength. There...
Page 157 - Coote to send in to summons the place. General Monnet returned for answer, that he would reply to the summons as soon as he had consulted a council of war. An hour had been allowed him for the purpose, but a considerable time beyond it having elapsed without...
Page 125 - I am happy, however, to have it in my power to add, that the Dutch are naturally a very charitable people.
Page 32 - ... their fire. In this manner, tempered only by the rain and darkness, the operations continued during a good part of the night. In the morning the town presented a most melancholy spectacle of ruins. Imagine a heavy circular mass of houses and walls battered by a cannonade of nearly fifty pieces of cannon, and this within three hundred yards of them, and you may form some idea of the horrible spectacle. The town really resembles nothing but a smoking pile of bricks. The fire seemed struggling for...
Page 155 - Caesar, astonished us all. It consisted of six twenty-four pounders, and played on the enemy incessantly. Every discharge seemed to be followed by a vast crash and ruin in the town. I must observe, by the way, that the seamen are all engineers, and manage the batteries as well, I had almost said better, than any of our artillery officers.
Page 270 - ing; the faces of the women are concealed under modest bonnets, and if you at any time catch their eyes, they receive your gaze with the innocency and unconcern of children ; they look at you till their curiosity is satisfied, and then revert to the preacher and the prayer-book.
Page 231 - His Excellency Lord Chatham, cornmantling the troops of his Britannic Majesty, being informed that many deserters, and persons belonging to the French troops, and some of them armed, are on the island, orders, that the before-mentioned armed or unarmed deserters, or other persons, be arrested, and delivered over to the nearest English detachment, and that no one presume to harbour such deserters, on pain of being sentenced, on Conviction, to pay a penalty of 100 florins...

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