Asiatick Researches: Or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal, for Inquiring Into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences, and Literature, of Asia, Volume 12

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John Murray, 1818 - Asia
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Vol. 2-3, 5-12 have lists of the members of the society.
 

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Page 250 - Pancha siddhantica, must be judged from those works, which are undoubtedly his by the unanimous consent of the learned, and by the testimony of the ancient scholiast BHATTOTPALA. The minor works, ascribed to the same author, may have been composed in later times, and the name of a celebrated author have been affixed to them, according to a practice, which is but too common in India as in many other countries.
Page 390 - ... it required every exertion and care to guard against a slip of about a hundred feet into a current, which dashed with great force amongst fragments of marble, which in two or three points actually formed a bridge across the stream. — In another part we were obliged to climb up the face of a rock nearly perpendicular, and on which irregularities, for the toe to hang upon, were at a most inconvenient distance. My left foot having slipped off one of them, I lay for a few seconds upon the poise,...
Page 427 - ... that played upon the forehead. The crown of the lappet was studded with small pearls, distributed in seven rows, and the lower part was decorated with green stones, something like turquoises, but marbled with coral beads, and many bands of silver and of a yellow metal, probably gold, about a finger's breadth. A stiff band of leather, something like a soldier's collar, was placed loosely round her neck, and ornamented with five rows of coral beads. The collar was secured with a button and clasp...
Page 239 - Hindus, as is well known, place the earth in the centre of the world, and make the Sun and Moon and minor planets revolve round it, apparently in concentric orbits, with unequal or irregular motion. For a physical explanation of the phenomena, they imagine the planets driven by currents of air along their respective orbits (besides one great vortex carrying stars and planets with prodigious velocity, round the earth, in the compass of a day). The winds or currents, impelling the several planets,...
Page 546 - Cappoor who pretend to that knowledge, but they cannot give any reasons for their judgment, l>eyond favourable dreams, which superstition has rendered infallible : and it must be admitted that the success of this description of people, in discovering and procuring, is greater than the majority of those who go in search of the Camphor: the distinction may have arisen from the peculiar...
Page 464 - ... generally ; the cow has a material of the same kind, not much inferior in warmth and softness, which I apprehend might prove a substitute for beaver ; the hare has her fur of peculiar length and thickness ; and even the dog has a coat of fur added to his usual covering of hair. — The wild horse ( Equus Quagga*), the wild ass (Goorkhen, Onagre), and I believe the mule, the offspring of these animals...
Page 232 - BENTLEY, in his ingenious essays inserted in the sixth and eighth volumes of our Researches.* Without entering at present into any disquisition on this subject, or discussing the accuracy of the premises; but acceding generally to the position, that the date of a set of astronomical tables, or of a system for the computation of the places of planets, is deducible from the ascertainment of a time when that system or set of tables gave results nearest to the truth...
Page 222 - Such motion, as results from the assigned revolutions, by which, places being calculated agree with those which are observed, must be admitted, whether taught by a holy sage or by a temporal teacher. If then the same places are deducible from other revolutions, which of the assigned motions is the true one ? The answer is, whichever agrees with present observation must be admitted. But, if in process of time, the difference become great, then men of genius, like BRAHMEGUPTA, will arise, who will...
Page 545 - ... or round cordate (as is the exterior one, if its folds be expanded.) Plumule simple, conical, two-leaved. Radicle near the summit towards the back, columnar, a little curved and ending in a short conical tip ; ascending. The seed has a strong terebinthine fragrance. The following particulars, concerning the extraction of the camphor, were communicated by Mr. PRINCE, Resident at Tapanooly, to Doctor ROXBURGH.
Page 542 - ... much resembling the bay in leaves." It is evident that the author of that essay (M. Macdonald), or the person from whom he derived his information (Lieut. Lewis), considered the plant in question to be a laurel ; as the camphor tree of Japan is described to be.* But, as neither of those gentlemen seems to have been conversant with botany, it continued to be far from improbable that the botanical character of the plant might have been mistaken by them ; and that it was referred by the author of...

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