The Name of the Rose

Front Cover
Everyman's Library, 2006 - Fiction - 560 pages
136 Reviews
(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

A spectacular best seller and now a classic, The Name of the Rose catapulted Umberto Eco, an Italian professor of semiotics turned novelist, to international prominence. An erudite murder mystery set in a fourteenth-century monastery, it is not only a gripping story but also a brilliant exploration of medieval philosophy, history, theology, and logic.

In 1327, Brother William of Baskerville is sent to investigate a wealthy Italian abbey whose monks are suspected of heresy. When his mission is overshadowed by seven bizarre deaths patterned on the book of Revelation, Brother William turns detective, following the trail of a conspiracy that brings him face-to-face with the abbey's labyrinthine secrets, the subversive effects of laughter, and the medieval Inquisition. Caught in a power struggle between the emperor he serves and the pope who rules the Church, Brother William comes to see that what is at stake is larger than any mere political dispute-that his investigation is being blocked by those who fear imagination, curiosity, and the power of ideas.

The Name of the Rose offers the reader not only an ingeniously constructed mystery--complete with secret symbols and coded manuscripts--but also an unparalleled portrait of the medieval world on the brink of profound transformation.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - smik - LibraryThing

I chose this book as my contribution to the Past Offences meme, Crime Fiction of the Year 1980, primarily because I had often meant to tackle it. To say I was disappointed is an understatement. I ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Proustitutes - LibraryThing

For me, this book prompted a healthy mixture of thoughts--sometimes I praised Eco's writing capabilities; sometimes I eagerly marked the page for a quote that I didn't want to forget, etc. But for the ... Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Umberto Eco is a professor of semiotics at the Universityof Bologna. His other books include Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of the Day Before, and three collections of popular essays, Travels in Hyperreality, Misreadings, and How to Travel with a Salmon and Other Essays. He lives in Milan.

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