Acts of Engagement: Writings on Art, Criticism, and Institutions, 1993-2002

Front Cover
Rowman & Littlefield, 2004 - Art - 303 pages
0 Reviews
From his unique vantage point as the dean of Dallas sports writers, Bob St. John brings us a soul-stirring portrait of one of America's most loved heroes-Tom Landry-who was, for twenty-nine years, the Dallas Cowboys' only head coach.Recounting Landry's phenomenal rise to coaching fame, St. John gives us glimpses of Landry as the intramural champion in light heavyweight boxing at the University of Texas, the decorated military veteran, the rugged college halfback, and the dedicated husband and father of a family that mattered more to him than any of his legendary football teams.For years St. John covered the Cowboys for the Dallas Morning News. So he brings to these pages a wealth of inside tales and touching vignettes of the coach who made them "America's team." As he traces the Cowboys' illustrious history to show us Tom Landry in action, St. John chronicles Those first agonizing years when the talent-poor Cowboys got pulverized by tough NFL teams The incredible ten-year coaching contract Murchison awarded to Landry after his first four humiliating seasons The first glimmerings of glory when Don Meredith, Bob Lilly, Mel Renfro, Lee Roy Jordan, and Walt Garrision became household names The Glory years-the Staubach years-with back-to-back Super Bowl contending teams The dog-days at the end of Landry's coaching career when the NFL's parity rules depleted the Cowboy's arsenal once more The seismic shock in Dallas when the team's new owner fired the world's favorite coachThousands gathered to honor "the man in the hat" shortly before he died. Former President George Bush said to him, "You're an inspiration to all who have ever watched or played the game of football." St. John recalls that moment: "As Landry walked off the speaker's stand it would be the last time most people would ever see him. That familiar face that seemed to be chiseled in stone with deep-set, pale eyes that could almost become slits when he smiled or deeply concentrated the chine that jutted out would become a fading memory. And then Landry walked away and was gone."But he has not been forgotten.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Fighting Words
21
Experience Complicity and Quality
29
Conversation
39
Juan Munoz Sound Sight Statuary
47
Art Criticism and the Aesthetic Response
65
Identity
73
Where Do We Go from Here? The Place of the Artist and the NEA
75
Resisting the Dangerous Journey The Crisis of Journalistic Criticism
83
Audience Artist Institution Community
159
Maya Lins Time
167
Sometimes Out of Sight Never Out of Mind The Story of the Hand in Modernist Sculpture
191
Giacomettis Dog
215
Power Corrupts For Daumier Humanity Was in the Streets
239
Magdalena Abakanowiczs War Games Monumental Horizontality
245
The Media and Museums
257
Convenience and Process Private versus Public Arts Funding
263

Art Museums and The Public
99
The Curators Moment
117
The Artist as Person
133
Audience
141
Healing in Time
143
The Guggenheim Corporate Populism and the Future of the Corporate Museum
277
About the Author
299
Credits
301
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Michael Brenson is on the faculty at the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, Bard College. He lives in Accord, New York.

Bibliographic information