The Economics of World War II: Six Great Powers in International Comparison

Front Cover
Mark Harrison
Cambridge University Press, Jun 26, 2000 - Business & Economics - 307 pages
This book provides a new quantitative view of the wartime economic experiences of six great powers; the UK, the USA, Germany, Italy, Japan and the USSR. What contribution did economics made to war preparedness and to winning or losing the war? What was the effect of wartime experiences on postwar fortunes, and did those who won the war lose the peace? A chapter is devoted to each country, reviewing its economic war potential, military-economic policies and performance, war expenditures and development, while the introductory chapter presents a comparative overview. The result of an international collaborative project, the volume aims to provide a text of statistical reference for students and researchers interested in international and comparative economic history, the history of World War II, the history of economic policy, and comparative economic systems. It embodies the latest in economic analysis and historical research.
 

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Contents

The economics of World War II an overview
1
Population territory and GDP
2
Size and development
18
The determinants of mobilization
22
Quantity and quality
25
Winning the war losing the peace
27
The United Kingdom Victory at all costs
43
Industry
56
The war economy
178
The cost of the war
197
War losses
207
Conclusion
213
Japan guns before rice
224
Production and expenditure
225
Economic controls during the war with China
233
Economic controls during the Pacific War
241

The longrun impact on wealth
65
Conclusion
72
The United State from ploughshares to swords
81
The production miracle
82
The factors of production
98
Financing the war
107
The longrun consequences of the war
111
Conclusion
117
Germany guns butter and economic miracles
122
The prewar economic miracle
123
As much butter as necessary as many guns as possible
131
Mobilization for war and the postwar inheritance
151
Conclusion
169
Italy how to lose the war and win the peace
177
Mobilization of the workforce
251
Mobilization of finance and money
256
Wartime statistics
261
changes due to wartime control
264
The Soviet Union the defeated victor
268
Mobilizing the potential
272
war finance
274
Real output and employment
279
The defence burden and foreign aid
286
Living standards and demography
290
the long run
292
Conclusion
296
Index
302
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Mark Harrison writes about the history and economics of Russia, conflict, defence and security. He is a Professor of Economics at the University of Warwick. He is also a research fellow of the Centre for Russian and East European Studies at the University of Birmingham and of the Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace at Stanford University.

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