A Hundreth Good Pointes of Husbandrie

Front Cover
Reprinted for R. Triphook and W. Sancho, 1810 - Agriculture - 20 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 14 - Then seauer thy groundes, and so keping them still : finde cattel at ease, and haue pasture at will. 70. In Marche, sow thy barley thy londe not to colde : the drier the better, a hundreth times tolde. That tilth harrowde finely, set sede time an ende : and praise, and pray God a good haruest to sende. 71. Sow wheate in a meane, sow thy Rie not to thin ; let peason and beanes, here and there, take therein. Sow barley and otes, good and thick doe not spare : giue lande leaue, her sede or her wede...
Page 19 - This done, set the pore ouer all for to gleane: and after thy catte!, to eate it vp cleane. Then spare it for pasture, till rowen be past: to lengthen thy dayrey, no better thou hast. 99. Then welcome thy haruest folke, seruauntes and all : •with mirth and good chere, let them furnish thine hall. The haruest lorde nightly, must geue thee a song: \ fill him then the blacke boll, or els he hath wrong.
Page 12 - Geld marefoles, but titts ere and nine dayes of age: they die els of gelding, some gelders wil gage. But marefoles, both likely of bulke and of bone : kepe such to bring coltes, let their gelding alone. 54. For gaining a trifle, sell neuer thy store : for chaunsing on worse, then thine owne were before. More larger of body, the better for brede : more forward of growing, the better they spede. 55. Thy sowes, great with fare, that come best for to rere : loke dayly thou seest them, and count them...
Page 11 - ... 46. When Christmas is done, kepe not Christmas time still : be mindefull of rering, and loth for to kill. For then, what thou rerist thou nede not to dout : will double thy gaine, ere the yere come about. 47. Be gredy to spende all, and careles to saue : and shortly be nedy, and redy to craue. be wilfull to kill, and vnskilfull to store : and sone giue vp houskeping, longe any more. 48. Thy calues then, that come betwene new yere and lent : saue gladly for store, lest thou after repent. For all...
Page 5 - ... dwell. 5. With some folke on sundayes, their tables do reke : and halfe the weke after, their diners to seke. At no tyme to much, but haue alway ynough : is housholdy fare, and the guyse of the plough. 6. For what shal it profet, ynough to prouide, and then haue it spoiled, or filched aside : As twenty lode busshes, cut downe at a clappe, such hede may be taken, shall stoppe but a gappe. 7. Good labouring threshers, are worthy to eate, Good husbandly ploughmen, deserueth their meate, Good huswiuely...
Page 13 - May bye thy hay for thy cattel to eate. 62. In Feuerell rest not for taking thine ease : get into the grounde with thy beanes and thy pease. Sow peason betimes and betimes they will come : the sooner the better they fill vp a rome. 63. In euery grene where the fence is not thine: the thornes stub out cleane that the grasse may be fine. Thy neighbours wil borow, els hack them beliue : so neither thy grasse nor the bushes shall thriuc.
Page 20 - Thinges thriftie, that teacheth the thriuing to thriue ; teache timely to trauas, the thing that thou triue. Transferring thy toyle, to the times truely tought : that teacheth the temperaunce, to temper thy thought. To temper thy trauaile, to tarrye the tide : this teacheth the thriftines, twenty times tride. Thinke truely to trauaile, that thinkest to thee : the trade that thy teacher taught truely to the. Take thankfully thinges, thanking tenderly those : that teacheth thee thriftly, thy time to...
Page 6 - ... riding about, the prises of thinges, all the yere thoroughout: And what time is best, for to sell that thou haue, and how for to bye, to be likely to saue. 13. For bying and selling, doth wonderfull well, to him that hath wit, how to by and to sell: But chopping and chaungeing, may make such a breck, that gone is thy winninges, for sauing thy neck. 14. The riche man, his bargaines are neuer vnsought, the seller will fynde him, he nede not take thought: But herein consisteth, a part of our text,...
Page 18 - Then muster thy folke, play the captaine thyselfe : prouiding them weapon, and suche kinde of pelfe. Get bottels and bagges, kepe the fielde in the heate : the feare is not muche, but the daunger is great. 91. With tossing and raking, and setting on cox : the grasse that was grene, is now hay for an ox. That done, leaue the tieth, lode thy cart and awaye : the battell is fought, thou hast gotten the daye. 92. Then doune with thy hedlondes, thy corne rounde about: leaue neuer a dalop, vnmoune or had...
Page 17 - Blum, 79. In June get thy wedehoke, thy knife and thy gloue : and wede out such wede, as the corne doth not loue. Slack no time thy weding, for darth nor for cheape : thy corne shall reward it, or euer thou reape.

Bibliographic information