The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal

Front Cover
W. Curry, jun., and Company, 1852
0 Reviews

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 78 - Thus saith the Lord, Let not the wise man glory in his wisdom, neither let the mighty man glory in his might, let not the rich man glory in his riches: but let him that glorieth glory in this, that he understandeth and knoweth me, that I am the Lord which exercise lovingkindness, judgment, and righteousness, in the earth: for in these things I delight, saith the Lord.
Page 358 - ... or ever the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or the pitcher be broken at the fountain, or the wheel broken at the cistern. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was : and the spirit shall return unto GOD Who gave it.
Page 535 - Now the bright morning star, day's harbinger, Comes dancing from the east, and leads with her The flowery May, who from her green lap throws The yellow cowslip, and the pale primrose. Hail bounteous May that dost inspire Mirth and youth, and warm desire; Woods and groves are of thy dressing, Hill and dale doth boast thy blessing. Thus we salute thee with our early song, And welcome thee, and wish thee long.
Page 406 - I will remember my covenant, which is between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh. "And the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is upon the earth.
Page 54 - O wha is this has don this deid, This ill deid don to me, To send me out this time o' the yeir, To sail upon the se!
Page 55 - ... ladies sit, Wi thair fans into their hand, Or eir they se Sir Patrick Spence Cum sailing to the land. O lang, lang may the ladies stand, Wi thair gold kems in their hair, Waiting for thair ain deir lords, For they'll se thame na mair.
Page 21 - And there shall be signs in the sun, and in the moon, and in the stars ; and upon the earth distress of nations, with perplexity; the sea and the waves roaring; men's hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth : for the powers of heaven shall be shaken.
Page 406 - O ! what is beauty's power ? It flourishes and dies ; Will the cold earth its silence break, To tell how soft, how smooth a cheek, Beneath its surface lies ? Mute, mute is all, O'er beauty's fall, Her praise resounds no more when mantled in her pall.
Page 55 - Wi' the auld moon in her arm; And, if we gang to sea, master, I fear we'll come to harm." They hadna sailed a league, a league, A league but barely three, When the lift grew dark, and the wind blew loud, And gurly grew the sea. The ankers brak, and the topmasts lap, It was sic a deadly storm; And the waves cam o'er the broken ship, Till a
Page 406 - ... fair, Forms turn to music, clouds to smiles and air; Rain gently spends his honey-drops, and pours Balm on the cleft earth, milk on grass and flowers. Bright pledge of peace and sunshine! the sure tie Of thy Lord's hand, the object of His eye! When I behold thee, though my light be dim, Distant and low, I can in thine see Him, Who looks upon thee from His glorious throne, And minds the covenant 'twixt All and One.

Bibliographic information