The Siberian Overland Route from Peking to Petersburg: Through the Deserts and Steppes of Mongolia, Tartary, &c

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J. Murray, 1864 - Asia, Central - 402 pages
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Page 36 - The Confucian temple was the first object of our curiosity. Here the great sage is worshipped by the Emperor once a year, without the medium of paintings or images. In the central shrine there is merely a small piece of wood, a few inches long, standing upright, with a few characters inscribed on it, the name of the sage, I believe. On the sides are a number of still smaller wooden labels, representing the disciples and commentators who have elucidated the writings of Confucius. The temple contains...
Page 37 - These trees have been stunted in their growth, however, from want of room, and considering their age, their size is disappointing. The courtyard is adorned by a variety of stone sculptures, the gifts of successive emperors and dynasties. The present dynasty has been rather jealous of its predecessors in this respect, especially of the Ming, and has replaced many fine relics of their time by new ones of its own. There are, however, several Mongol tablets to the fore in the Confucian temple . A connoisseur...
Page 182 - ... de quelque manière qu'on explique l'expérience, il est certain que les grands mangeurs de viande sont en général cruels et féroces plus que les autres hommes : cette observation est de tous les lieux et de tous les temps.
Page 69 - Near this place is ;a deep rock, ftanding on a plain, inacceffible on all fides, except to the weft, where a narrow winding path is cut in the rock, which leads to a Pagan temple and nunnery built upon the top of it. Thefe edifices make a pretty appearance from the plain ; and, as the ftory goes, were built from the foundation in one night by a lady, on the following occalion.
Page 203 - Maimatchin, which simply signifies " the mart," for many Chinese towns have their maimatchins. It is surrounded by a palisade ; the streets are regular, wide, and tolerably clean. The houses are solid, tidy, and tastefully decorated with pretty little court-yards and ornamental screens. The merchants live here without their wives and families, and, according to M. Russell-Killough, they are honest in their dealings, polite without being obsequious, and very liberal. " I have eat dinners with them...
Page 85 - All the trees were grubbed up, the forests disappeared from the hills, the prairies were cleared by means of fire, and the new cultivators set busily to work in exhausting the fecundity of the soil. Almost the entire region is now in the hands of the Chinese, and it is probably to their system of devastation that we must attribute the extreme irregularity of the seasons which now desolate this unhappy land.
Page 37 - Chinese point pf view, a noble one, and singularly enough, it is kept in perfect order, in strange contrast to Chinese temples and public buildings generally. It has a magnificent ceiling, very high, and the top of the interior walls are ornamented by wooden boards, richly painted, bearing the names of the successive emperors in raised gilt characters. On the accession of an emperor he at once adds his name to the long list. " The hall erected by the learned Emperor Kienloong, although modern (he...
Page 210 - The Russians and the Chinese are peculiarly suited to each other in the commercial as well as in the diplomatic departments. They have an equal regard for truth, for the Russian, spite of his fair complexion, is at the bottom more than half Asiatic. There is nothing original about this observation, but it serves to explain how it is that the Russians have won their way into China by quiet and peaceable means, while we have always been running our head against a stone wall, and never could get over...
Page 170 - Huns ;36 and the alliance of the haughty Tanjous was secured by their marriage with the genuine, or adopted, daughters of the Imperial family, which vainly attempted to escape the sacrilegious pollution. The situation of these unhappy victims is described in the verses of a Chinese princess, who laments...
Page 365 - Gordon, have not degenerated ; they are as fresh and vigorous as ever they were; it is the Government only that has become old and feeble; and a change of Dynasty may yet restore to China the lustre which legitimately belongs to so great a nation. The indestructible vitality of Chinese institutions has preserved the country unchanged throughout many revolutions. The high civilization of the people, and their earnestness in the pursuit of peaceful industries, have enabled them to maintain their national...

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