American Renaissance: A Review of Domestic Architecture

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W. T. Comstock, 1904 - Architecture - 182 pages
 

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Page 35 - But were stopped by the door of a tomb By the door of a legended tomb; And I said - 'What is written, sweet sister, On the door of this legended tomb?
Page 66 - Scott, being: a minor at the time of the conclusion of the treaty of peace between Great Britain and the United States, was...
Page 21 - We want to belong somewhere and to something, not to be entirely cut off by ourselves as stray atoms in boundless space either geographical or chronological. The human mind is a dependent thing and so is happiness. We may not, indeed, have inherited the house we live in ; the chances are we have not. We may not remember that either of our parents or any of our grandparents before us, ever gloried in the quiet possession of...
Page 32 - But Psyche, uplifting her finger, Said - 'Sadly this star I mistrust Her pallor I strangely mistrust: Oh, hasten! - oh, let us not linger! Oh, fly! - let us fly! - for we must.
Page 20 - It must presuppose, by subtle architectonic expression, both in itself and in its surroundings, that its owner possessed, once upon a time, two good parents, four grandparents, eight greatgrandparents, and so on; had, likely, brothers and sisters, uncles and aunts, all eminently respectable and endeared to him...
Page 23 - The predominant local color which distinguishes American Renaissance has been given to it by what has been our great national building commodity, ie, wood. The Greeks and Romans built of stone when they had the money to pay for it. Both stone and wood have grain, and have to be used with the same careful regard for it. Whether we build our columns up of stone or wooden sections — latitudinal in the one case, longitudinal in the other — to support a cornice also constructed in sections according...
Page 23 - Whether we build our columns up of stone or wooden sections — latitudinal in the one case, longitudinal in the other— to support a cornice also constructed in sections according to the convenient sizes of commerce for the particular material, makes no difference to the canons of art so long as we are not trying to deceive or to imitate one material with another simply with that end in view. It is extremely doubtful if our American ancestors were ever guilty of premeditated deception. Their material...
Page 9 - This review of American renaissance originally appeared as a series of papers in the "Architects and builders
Page 9 - Outline history of American domestic architecture from colonial times to the present day. Fully illustrated.
Page 21 - ... chronological. The human mind is a dependent thing and so is happiness. We may not, indeed, have inherited the house we live in ; the chances are we have not. We may not remember that either of our parents or any of our grandparents before us, ever gloried in the quiet possession of an ideal homestead ; but for the sake of goodness — for the sake of making the world appear a more decent place to live in — let us pretend that they did, and that it. is now ours. Let us pretend that God has...

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