Hammers Over the Anvil

Front Cover
Allen & Unwin, Jan 1, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 142 pages
Alan Marshall grew up observing and recording life in a Victorian country town, writing about it with humour and compassion.

In this collection of short stories we watch the young Alan growing up in country Turalla. Crippled by polio at an early age, he has to use crutches, knowing that he'll never be able to pursue his great love-horse-riding. His disability does not stop the young boy from roaming the countryside with his mate Joe, however, all the time scribbling in his notebook about the intriguing lives of the people he meets, and trying to make sense of the world around him.
 

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Contents

DUKE McLEOD
1
MICK HANRAHAN
11
PETER McLEOD
14
JIMMY VIRTUE
20
ELSIE
22
EAST DRISCOLL
26
JOES HOME
31
OLD MRS BILSON
41
MISS TRENGROVE
81
FEAR
90
JUDY FLIESHER
95
SNARLY BURNS
99
FRECKLES JACK
100
MISS McALISTER
105
MISS BARLOW
119
MISS McPHERSON
123

MISS ARMITAGE
54
PAT CORRIGAN
59
MR THOMAS
66
THE OSTRICH MAN
69
THE CATHOLIC BALL
128
BACK COVER
137
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About the author (2012)

A writer with an ear for the rhythms of Australian speech, Melbourne-based Alan Marshall published in the dominant social realist tradition of the 1940s and '50s. The author of short stories, journalism, children's books, novels and advice columns, he is best remembered for the first book of his autobiography, I Can Jump Puddles (1955). His work is marked by a deep interest in rural and working-class life, with an emphasis on shared experience.

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