Ned Myers, Or, A Life Before the Mast

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Stringer and Townsend, 1856 - 232 pages
 

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"Ned Myers; of A Life Before The Mast" edited by James Fenimore Cooper What a great book. Ned Myers ran away to sea at age 10 and he says of it ; "Some idea may be formed of my recklessness, and ... Read full review

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Page 114 - It was a very clear case of septicemia, and if anything was to be done it must be done at once.
Page iii - Thou unrelenting Past! Strong are the barriers round thy dark domain, And fetters, sure and fast, Hold all that enter thy unbreathing reign. Far in thy realm withdrawn Old empires sit in sullenness and gloom, And glorious ages gone Lie deep within the shadow of thy womb. Childhood, with all its mirth, Youth, Manhood, Age that draws us to the ground, And last, Man's Life on earth, Glide to thy dim dominions, and are bound.
Page 59 - At sundown the enemy bore NW by N. on the starboard tack. The wind hauling to the westward I stood to the northward all night, in order to gain the north shore; at daylight tacked to the westward, the wind having changed to NNW .; soon after discovered the enemy's fleet bearing SW I took the Asp and the Madison, the Fair American in tow and made all sail in chase.
Page 16 - Cooper, who soon became a branch pilot, in those waters, about the parks and west end * but I was too young to learn much, or to observe much. Most of us went to see the monument, St. Paul's, and the lions ; and Cooper put himself in charge of a beef-eater, and took a look at the arsenals, jewels and armoury. He had a rum time of it, in his sailor rig, but hoisted in a wonderful deal of gibberish, according to his own account of his cruise.
Page 16 - I had one or two cruises, of a Sunday, in tow of Cooper, who soon became a branch pilot, in those waters, about the parks and west end • but I was too young to learn much, or to observe much. Most of us went to see the monument, St. Paul's, and the lions ; and Cooper put himself in charge of a beef-eater, and took a look at the arsenals, jewels and armoury. He had a rum time of it, in his sailor rig, but hoisted in a wonderful...
Page 14 - Next day the stevedores took the ship into the stream, and the crew came on board. The assembling of the crew of a merchantman, in that day, was a melancholy sight. The men came off, bearing about them the signs of the excesses of which they had been guilty while on shore...
Page 53 - ... of heaven were opened, and it lightened awfully. . . . I could hear many [men] around me, and, occasionally, I saw the heads of men, struggling in the lake. . . . I now saw a man quite near the boat; and . . . made a spring amidships, catching this poor fellow by the collar. He was very near gone; the water several feet from the place where I had stood. It is my opinion the schooner sunk as I left her. I went down some distance myself, and when I came up to the surface, I began to swim vigorously...
Page vii - If to this be added the sound and accurate moral principles that now appear to govern both his acts and his opinions, we find a man every way entitled to speak for himself ; the want of the habit of communicating his thoughts to the public, alone excepted. In this book, the writer has endeavoured to adhere as closely to the very language of his subject, as circumstances will at all allow ; and in many places he feels confident that no art of his own could, in any respect, improve it. It is probable...

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