Travels Into the Interior Parts of Africa, Volume 1

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G. G. and J. Robinson, 1796 - South Africa
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Page 41 - ... innumerable legions of birds, as we principally disturbed the females which were then sitting. They had nests, eggs, and young to defend. They were like furious harpies let loose against us, and their cries rendered us almost deaf. They often flew so near us that they flapped their wings in our faces, and though we fired our pieces repeatedly we were not able to frighten them; it seemed almost impossible to disperse this cloud. We could not move one step without crushing either their eggs or...
Page 126 - ... afforded me much amusement. He laid hold of the tuft of leaves with his teeth, and, pressing his four paws firmly against the earth and drawing his head backwards, the root generally followed. When this method (which required considerable force) did not succeed, he seized the tuft as before as close to the earth as he could, then throwing his heels over his head the root always yielded to the jerk which he gave it. In our marches, when he found himself tired, he got upon the back of one of my...
Page 41 - Africa, wen here assembled. All their voices, mixed together and modified according to their different kinds, formed such a horrid music that I was every moment obliged to cover my head to give a little relief to my ears. The alarm which we spread was so much the more general among these innumerable legions of birds, as we principally disturbed the females which were then sitting. They had nests, eggs, and young to defend. They were like furious harpies let loose against us, and their cries rendered...
Page 41 - which is about two feet in length, does not carry its body in the same manner as others : it stands perpendicularly on its two feet, which gives it an air of gravity, so much the more ridiculous, as its wings, which have no feathers, hang carelessly down on each side : it never uses them but in swimming. As we advanced towards the middle of the island, we met innumerable...
Page 40 - Le Vaillant, upon visiting Dassen-Eyland, where was the tomb of a Danish captain, at the entrance of Saldanha Bay, beheld, as he says, after wading through the surf and clambering up the rocks, such a spectacle as never perhaps appeared to the eye of mortal. " All. of a sudden there arose from the whole surface of the island an impenetrable cloud, which formed, at the distance of forty feet above our heads, an immense canopy, or rather a sky, composed of birds of every species, and of all colours—...
Page 40 - ... impenetrable cloud, which formed, at the distance of forty feet above our heads, an immense canopy, or rather a sky, composed of birds of every species, and of all colours— cormorants, sea-gulls, sea-swallows, pelicans, and I believe the whole winged tribe of this part of Africa, wen here assembled. All their voices, mixed together and modified according to...
Page 214 - I should soon forget the trunk; and, in order to convince 'me, he promised me a most luscious breakfast, which he instantly ordered to be prepared. The four feet of the animal were then cut off: a hole about three or four feet square was made in the earth, and filled with burning coals ; and, the whole being covered with dry wood, a large fire was kept up in it during the greater part of the night. When the "hole was sufficiently heated, everything was taken from it. Klaas placed in it the four feet...
Page 127 - ... animal well knew how to avoid this drudgery. The moment he .perceived Kees on his shoulders, he remained motionless, and suffered the caravan to pass on, without ever stirring from the spot. The timorous Kees still persisted ; but as soon as he began to lose sight of us, he was obliged to dismount, and both he and the dog ran with all their might to overtake us. For fear of being surprised, the dog dexterously suffered him to get before him, and watched him with great attention. In short, he...
Page 277 - My people chastised him for these thefts ; but that did not make him amend his conduct. I myself sometimes whipped him ; but then he ran away, and did not return again to the tent until it grew dark. Once, as I was about to dine, and had put the beans, which I had boiled for myself, upon a plate, I heard the voice of a bird with which I was not acquainted. I left my dinner standing, seized my gun, and ran out of the tent.
Page 123 - As it was extremely familiar, and attached itself to me in a particular manner, I made it my taster. When we found any fruit or roots unknown to my Hottentots, we never touched them until my dear Kees had first tasted them ; if it refused them, we judged them to be either disagreeable or dangerous, and threw them away.

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