All Honourable Men: The Social Origins of War in Lebanon

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I.B.Tauris, 2001 - Political Science - 298 pages
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Ethnic conflict is a pervasive feature of the modern world, yet while there are many studies of the social construction of difference, there are few that deal with the emotional content of ethnic violence. Drawing on sociological and psychoanalytic theory and using comparative examples from other parts of the world, Michael Johnson examines the history of confessional or ethnic identity in Lebanon and the civil wars of the 1970s and 1980s. He demonstrates that far from being residues of a traditional society, the values of ethnic honor and shame are peculiarly modern phenomena. He explains the horrors of ethnic warfare in terms of social threats to patriarchal authority in sexually repressive families. These threats fuel a style of violence in which shame acquires its own dynamics.
 

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Contents

Class and client
5
Ethnicity and history
21
Agrarian society and the city
40
Honour and the state
54
Honour and reproduction
67
Lebanon and the nineteenth century
85
Honour and reproduction
98
Honour and confession
122
Ethnic violence and psychoanalysis
173
Ethnic conflict and sociology
182
Neopatriarchy and surveillance
204
external determinants of ethnic nationalism
223
Elections and confessionalism
237
References
261
Index
279
Copyright

Ethnicity and kinship
154

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About the author (2001)

Michael Johnson is Dean of the School of African and Asian Studies at the University of Sussex.

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