The Correspondence and Miscellanies of the Hon. John Cotton Smith ...

Front Cover
Harper & brothers, 1847 - Connecticut - 328 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 280 - Let not this weak, unknowing hand Presume thy bolts to throw, And deal damnation round the land On each I judge thy foe. If I am right, thy grace impart, Still in the right to stay ; If I am wrong, oh teach my heart To find that better way.
Page 53 - Whose powers shed round him in the common strife, Or mild concerns of ordinary life, A constant influence, a peculiar grace; But who, if he be called upon to face Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined Great issues, good or bad for human kind, Is happy as a Lover; and attired With sudden brightness, like a Man inspired...
Page 50 - When the ear heard me, then it blessed me; and when the eye saw me, it gave witness to me: Because I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me: and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
Page 280 - Yet not to earth's contracted span Thy goodness let me bound, Or think Thee Lord alone of man. When thousand worlds are round. Let not this weak, unknowing hand Presume thy bolts to throw, And deal damnation round the land On each I judge Thy foe.
Page 3 - Commentaries on the Gallic War, and the First Book of the Greek Paraphrase ; with English Notes, Critical and Explanatory, Plans of Battles, Sieges, &c., and Historical, Geographical, and Archaeological Indexes.
Page 1 - Latin Grammar, Part I. Containing the most important Parts of the Grammar of the Latin Language, together with appropriate Exercises in the translating and writing of Latin. 12mo, Sheep extra, 75 cents.
Page 280 - Through this day's life or death. This day, be bread and peace my lot: All else beneath the sun, Thou know'st if best bestowed or not; And let Thy will be done. To Thee, whose temple is all space, Whose altar earth, sea, skies, One chorus let all being raise, All Nature's incense rise!
Page 53 - Who, if he rise to station of command, Rises by open means; and there will stand On honourable terms, or else retire, And in himself possess his own desire: Who comprehends his trust, and to the same, Keeps faithful with a singleness of aim...
Page 328 - God was thy ransom, thy guardian and guide ; He gave thee, he took thee, and he will restore thee, And death has no sting, for the Saviour has died...
Page 53 - He who though thus endued as with a sense And faculty for storm and turbulence, Is yet a soul whose master-bias leans To home-felt pleasures and to gentle scenes ; Sweet images! which, wheresoe'er he be, Are at his heart; and such fidelity It is his darling passion to approve ; More brave for this, that he hath much to love...

Bibliographic information