Mandate of Heaven: The Legacy of Tiananmen Square and the Next Generation of China's Leaders

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Simon and Schuster, 1995 - History - 464 pages
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The China of the 1990s is a country of profound contradictions: Maoist ideology coexists with an entrepreneurial spirit that has made China one of the world's economic powerhouses; a rebellious, irreverent popular culture thrives in the shadow of a totalitarian political system; a nihilistic subculture coexists alongside ancient traditions of obedience, conformity, and respect for tradition.

In "Mandate of Heaven" Orville Schell, one of America's foremost China specialists, interprets these conflicting developments and brilliantly documents the new power structures, economic initiatives, and cultural changes that have transformed China since the Tiananmen Square demonstrations of 1989. Schell takes readers on a series of journeys inside this latter-day People's Republic and introduces us to a broad spectrum of people, from students and workers to entrepreneurs, pop stars, and party officials, who, although they acted out the drama of the Square, are now playing the prominent roles in China's high-speed economic rush into the future.

As China's role on the world stage grows, it becomes increasingly important that the West acquaint itself with the people who will be leading it into the twenty-first century. "Mandate of Heaven" is the authoritative and definitive account of this generation as it moves into a capitalist economic future while still clinging to the structures of its communist past.

 

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MANDATE OF HEAVEN: A New Generation of Entrepreneurs, Dissidents, Bohemians, and Technocrats Lays Claim to China's Future

User Review  - Kirkus

The latest in a splendid series by Schell (Discos and Democracy, 1988, etc.), extending over 20 years and tracking momentous changes in the world's most populous country. Beginning almost where he ... Read full review

Mandate of heaven: a new generation of entrepreneurs, dissidents, bohemians, and technocrats lays claim to China's future

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Although the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre is important to Americans who are concerned about human rights in China, Schell reiterates much of what already has been observed by others. The difference ... Read full review

Contents

The Year of the Snake
33
Fissures at the Top
65
The Eye of the Storm
148
To Right a Wrong It Is Necessary to Exceed a Proper Limit
159
We Should Not Have One Bit of Forgiveness for Them
164
A Hundred Flowers Fade
175
Part II
183
Imprisonment
185
The Second Channel
293
Nothing to My Name
311
The Graying of Chinese Culture
321
Part V
329
Greater China
331
Deng Makes a Visit
341
Dengs Reformist Roots
347
Reform Returns
358

Internment in Limbo
197
Escape
207
Verdict First Trial Second
216
Part III
229
Back to the Square
231
Learning to Love Socialism and the Army
240
The Spirit of a Screw
246
Interrogation and Surveillance
253
Miniature Rebellions
265
Part IV
277
Chairman Mao as Pop Art
279
The People Play the Market
363
Shanghai on Commercial Fire
380
The Big Boom
391
Hints of Political Reform
407
Shadows of the Past
413
Cycles of Weirdness
428
Exile Dreams
437
Notes on Sources
443
Index
448
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About the author (1995)

Orville Schell is a China expert/journalist with a unique understanding of China and exceptional access to China's next generation of leaders. A writer with more than thirty-five years' experience studying China at Harvard and at the University of California, Berkeley, and writing about China for such magazines as The Atlantic, The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books, Schell has won numerous awards for his China reporting, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Freedom Forum Senior Fellowship at Columbia University.

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