Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-glass

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 1993 - Juvenile Fiction - 263 pages
12 Reviews
This edition contains Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking Glass. It is illustrated throughout by Sir John Tenniel, whose drawings for the books add so much to the enjoyment of them.

Tweedledum and Tweedledee, the Mad Hatter, the Cheshire Cat, the Red Queen and the White Rabbit all make their appearances, and are now familiar figures in writing, conversation and idiom. So too, are Carroll's delightful verses such as 'The Walrus and the Carpenter' and the inspired jargon of that masterly Wordsworthian parody, 'The Jabberwocky'.
 

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Everyone should have a copy

User Review  - jklein360 - Overstock.com

I couldnt believe I didnt have a copy of this book. So I had to buy it. Great pictures. Great read. Read full review

Review: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass (Alice)

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

Complete nonsense. Reading this today, I was unable to pick up on the political satire it was meant for and therefore I did not enjoy the numerous creations of Lewis Carroll's imagination. I did not enjoy his writing style, or the numerous characters that kept jumbling together in my head. Read full review

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Contents

SEVEN A Mad TeaParty
70
THREE LookingGlass Insects
163
An Easter Greeting
262
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Charles Luthwidge Dodgson was born in Daresbury, England on January 27, 1832. He became a minister of the Church of England and a lecturer in mathematics at Christ Church College, Oxford. He was the author, under his own name, of An Elementary Treatise on Determinants, Symbolic Logic, and other scholarly treatises. He is better known by his pen name of Lewis Carroll. Using this name, he wrote Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. He was also a pioneering photographer, and he took many pictures of young children, especially girls, with whom he seemed to empathize. He died on January 14, 1898.

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