The Christian Equivalent of War

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Association Press, 1915 - International relations - 154 pages
 

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Page 115 - And unto him that smiteth thee on the one cheek offer also the other; and him that taketh away thy cloak forbid not to take thy coat also.
Page 142 - Then said Jesus unto him, Put up again thy sword into his place : for all they that take the sword shall perish with the sword.
Page 49 - And he said unto them, The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and they that exercise authority upon them are called benefactors. But ye shall not be so: but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.
Page 19 - Lord. But if thine enemy hunger, feed him ; if he thirst, give him to drink : for in so doing thou shall heap coals of fire upon his head. Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.
Page 59 - So far from that, all the pure and noble arts of peace are founded on war; no great art ever yet rose on earth, but among a nation of soldiers.
Page 61 - Modern war is so expensive that we feel trade to be a better avenue to plunder; but modern man inherits all the innate pugnacity and all the love of glory of his ancestors.
Page 17 - All things therefore whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, even so do ye also unto them: for this is the law and the prophets.
Page 59 - I saw it to be quite an undeniable fact. The common notion that peace and the virtues of civil life flourished together, I found to be wholly untenable. Peace and the vices of civil life only flourish together. We talk of peace and learning...
Page 78 - For if ye love them which love you, what thank have ye ? for sinners also love those that love them. And if ye do good to them which do good to you, what thank have ye ? for sinners also do even the same.
Page 139 - China has already found, that in this world the nation that has trained itself to a career of unwarlike and isolated ease is bound, in the end, to go down before other nations which have not lost the manly and adventurous qualities.

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