Learning to Look at Paintings

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Psychology Press, 1997 - Art - 241 pages
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This is a critique of works of art dating from the early fifteenth century through to modern installations. Suggesting a series of questions to ask when looking at a painting this will help develop a critical understanding of art.
 

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Contents

Composition
1
Space
25
Geometrical space
31
Aerial perspective
37
Multipleviewpoint perspective
43
Conclusion
50
Form
51
Tone
81
Historical subjects
127
Literary subjectmatter
133
clarity and ambiguity
142
Subjectmatter and the idea of abstraction
153
Drawing and its purposes
160
Drawing and sculptural expression
167
Line drawing
174
Conclusion
183

Tone and the expression of emotion
87
Tone used to create atmosphere
93
Colour
103
The use of colour to express emotion
109
Colour and scale
115
Religious subjects
121
The creation of mystery and ambivalence by means of tone
192
Lithography
200
Silk screen printing and the use of modern printing
209
some questions to ask yourself when
216
References and further reading
229
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About the author (1997)

Mary Acton is a tutor and director of the Undergraduate Certificate in History of Art at Oxford University's Department of Continuing Education.

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