History of English Poetry, Volume 1

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Printed for, and sold by J. Dodsley, 1774 - English poetry
 

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Page 294 - ... the differences of princes, concluding treaties of peace, and concerting alliances : they prefided in cabinet councils, levied national fubfidies, influenced courts, and managed the machines of every important operation and event, both in the religious and political world.
Page v - The constraint, imposed by a mechanical attention to this distribution, appeared to me to destroy that free exertion of research, with which such a history ought to be executed, and not easily reconcileable * Disqiuiition*, p.
Page 11 - Ther is a wel fair abbei, Of white monkes, and of grei, Ther beth bowris and halles: Al of pasteiis beth the walles, Of fleis, of fisse, and rich met, The likfullist that man mai et. Fluren cakes beth the schingles alle, Of cherche, cloister, boure and halle. The pinnes beth fat podinges, Rich met to princez and kinges.
Page 391 - He is left by the eagle near the house, which is built of materials bright as polished glass, and stands on a rock of ice of excessive height, and almost inaccessible. All the southern side of...
Page 11 - Up a river of fwet milk Whar is plente grete of filk. When the fummeris dai is hote, The yung nunnes takith a bote And doth ham...
Page 396 - An attempt to unite order and exactness of imagery with a subject formed on principles so professedly romantic and anomalous, is like giving Corinthian pillars to a Gothic palace.
Page 243 - Mathias, sending of the Holy Ghost, &c. by the Fishmongers. Antichrist, by the Clothiers. Day of Judgment, by the Websters. The reader will perhaps smile at some of these combinations. This is the substance and order of the former part of the play. God enters creating the world ; he breathes life into Adam, leads him into Paradise, and opens his side while sleeping. Adam and Eve appear naked, and not ashamed, and the old serpent enters lamenting his fall. He converses with Eve. She eats of the forbidden...
Page 11 - These fictions, coinciding with the reigning manners and perpetually kept up and improved in the tales of Troubadours and...
Page 11 - Lanfranc in the year 1072, the following injunction occurs. At the beginning of Lent, the librarian is ordered to deliver a book to each of the religious...
Page 11 - Even so late as the year 1471, when Louis XI. borrowed the works of Rasis, the Arabian physician, from the faculty of medicine in Paris, he not only deposited in pledge a considerable quantity of plate, but was obliged to procure a nobleman to join with him as surety in a deed, binding himself under a great forfeiture to restore it.

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