Don't Lie to Me

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Open Road Media, Jun 25, 2013 - Fiction - 179 pages
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Working night security at a museum, Mitch Tobin finds a dead man in his birthday suit
When he first met Linda Campbell, Mitchell Tobin was nothing more to her than the man who had put her husband in jail. It took over a year for them to begin their affair, but once it started, it became intense—lasting right up to the day when Tobin shirked duty to see her, and his partner got killed as a result. Years later, on a penny-ante night security job, Tobin is doing his rounds when Linda comes to ask a favor. Out of prison and hoping to go straight, her husband is having trouble escaping his old cronies. Tobin has just agreed to try to help when they come upon a corpse, lying naked on the floor.
If he’s to do anything for Linda, Tobin will have to keep clear of the murder investigation. But as her husband knew all too well, it takes much more than self-discipline to put a checkered past behind you.
 

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About the author (2013)

Donald E. Westlake (1933–2008) was one of the most prolific and talented authors of American crime fiction. He began his career in the late 1950s, churning out novels for pulp houses—often writing as many as four novels a year under various pseudonyms—but soon began publishing under his own name. His most well-known characters were John Dortmunder, an unlucky thief, and a ruthless criminal named Parker. His writing earned him three Edgars and a Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America. 
Westlake’s cinematic prose and brisk dialogue made his novels attractive to Hollywood, and several motion pictures were made from his books, with stars such as Lee Marvin and Mel Gibson. Westlake wrote several screenplays himself, receiving an Academy Award nomination for his adaptation of The Grifters, Jim Thompson’s noir classic.      

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