Yorkshire: An Historical and Topographical Introduction to a Knowledge of the Ancient State of the Wapentake of Strafford and Tickhill; with Ample Accounts of Doncaster and Conisbrough; and of the Villages, Hamlets, Churches, Antiquities, and Other Matters Connected Therewith

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J. Blackwell, 1829 - Strafford (England) - 227 pages
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Page cxviii - But thus shall ye deal with them; ye shall destroy their altars, and break down their images, and cut down their groves, and burn their graven images with fire.
Page clxxvi - When nothing, but the name of zeal, appears 'Twixt our best actions, and the worst of theirs, What does he think our sacrilege would spare, When such th' effects of our devotion are ? ' COOPER'S HILL, by Sir JOHN DENHAM.
Page 65 - ... emerged. So this life of man appears for a short space, but of what went before, or what is to follow, we are utterly ignorant. If, therefore, this new doctrine contains something more certain, it seems justly to deserve to be followed.
Page 46 - Sec., have granted to him the ninth lamb, the ninth fleece, and the ninth sheaf, to be taken by two years then next to come. And of cities and boroughs the very ninth part of all their goods and chattels...
Page 194 - No constable shall distrain any knight for to give money for keeping of his castle, if he himself will do it in his proper person, or cause it to be done by another sufficient man, if he may not do it himself for a reasonable cause ; and if we do lead or send him in an army, he shall be free from castleward for the time that he shall be with us in fee in our host, for the which he hath done service in our wars.
Page cxviii - Then shall ye know that I am the LORD, when their slain men shall be among their idols round about their altars, upon every high hill, in all the tops of the mountains, and under every green tree, and under every thick oak, the place where they did offer sweet savour to all their idols.
Page clxxvi - What barbarous invader sack'd the land ? But when he hears no Goth, no Turk, did bring This desolation, but a Christian king ; When nothing but the name of zeal appears 'Twixt our best actions and the worst of theirs...
Page xxvii - In every parish is (or was) a church-house, to which belonged spits, crocks, &c., utensils for dressing provision. Here the housekeepers met and were merry, and gave their charity. The young people were there too, and had dancing, bowling, shooting at butts, &c., the ancients sitting gravely by, and looking on. All things were civil, and without scandal.
Page cxviii - And Abraham planted a grove in Beer-sheba, and called there on the name of the LORD, the everlasting God.
Page cxviii - Thou shalt not plant thee a grove of any trees near unto the altar of the LORD thy God, which thou shalt make thee.

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