Spanish Ironwork

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The Hispanic society of America, 1915 - Ironwork - 143 pages
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Page 2 - ... artistic treatment, and will, as our taste improves, probably be swept away ; but even where some happily surviving antiquity has been copied, it needs no antiquary or specialist to become at once conscious which is the old and which the new. The explanation is simply that the olden-time smith cut a piece from his shingled bar which he judged by the eye would beat out into a rod of the required length, or curl into a scroll of the desired form. More or less sufficed for him, and by his method...
Page 2 - The tools of the smithy proper consist merely of hammer and anvil, forge and bellows, tongs and chisels. In the work we have described, small objects such as hinges, however complicated in design, were nearly always welded into a single piece, while in grilles the several pieces were fixed by driving holes through the heated iron and riveting them together, or more commonly by binding the pieces round with hot wisps of iron called collars. In appreciating this old work, we must not forget that, while...
Page 1 - ... The close of the thirteenth century marks, roughly speaking, the end of a period which we may properly define as that of genuine blacksmithing. The texture of iron, it is well known, becomes loosened by heat, and, as it softens, bars will droop and curl into scrolls under a relatively slight impetus, this property rendering it so facile a metal in the hands of the smith. When hot it can be welded, separate pieces adhering firmly together if hammered or pressed, and the rich and intricate effects...
Page 1 - ... were others of plainer scrollwork, and scrolls and fleurs-de-lis were often mingled in the designs with the foliage, which in time developed new characters. The close of the thirteenth century marks, roughly speaking, the end of a period which we may properly define as that of genuine blacksmithing. The texture of iron, it is well known, becomes loosened by heat, and, as it softens, bars will droop and curl into scrolls under a relatively slight impetus, this property rendering it so facile a...
Page 2 - ... however complicated in design, were nearly always welded into a single piece, while in grilles the several pieces were fixed by driving holes through the heated iron and riveting them together, or more commonly by binding the pieces round with hot wisps of iron called collars. In appreciating this old work, we must not forget that, while the smith of to-day can buy his iron ready rolled into a thousand different sections, he had then to beat out every section with his own hand. Hence old ironwork...
Page 135 - Catalogue of ironwork in the collection of the Hispanic Society of America.
Page 110 - ... exceeding 10,000 crowns which had to be defrayed by the loser. Dummy keys were given as badges to officials who had no occasion to use them, and to some noblemen not of the household as a mark of distinction. They are known to collectors as chamberlain's keys. There is a fine series of them in the British Museum, but they possess no artistic merit.
Page 26 - ... consisting of interlacing ogee arches with crocketed pinnacles between them, all very elaborately hammered up. The horizontal bars and rails are also all covered with traceries in relief, and at regular intervals on these there are small figures under canopies. The whole stands upon a moulded and panelled base of stone. The total height of this screen is not less than thirty feet, of which the cresting is about a third.
Page 24 - Keja in front of the Capilla mayor is much finer ; it is of wrought iron, and is made, as is so usual, with vertical bars, set rather close together, and alternately plain and twisted. What the lower part lacks in ornament the cresting more than atones for ; it is unusually ornate, consisting of interlacing ogee arches with crocketed pinnacles between them, all very elaborately hammered up. The horizontal bars and rails are also all covered with traceries in relief, and at regular intervals on these...
Page 96 - II Caparra" by Lorenzo di Medici, from his habit of demanding payment in advance. Vasari somewhat mitigates his Shylockian tendencies by declaring with more enthusiasm than accuracy, that II Caparra "was unique in his calling, without an equal in the past, and probably not to be excelled in the future." Modern craftsmen may well envy old Nicolo his financial audacity, his publicity agent Vasari, and his sundry torch- and standard-holders, and lamps (Palazzi Strozzi and Guadagni, Figures 67, 296 and...

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