A Voyage to Pagany: William Carlos Williams. With an Introd. by Harry Levin

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New Directions Publishing, 1970 - Fiction - 267 pages
WCW, A Voyage to Pagany. Novel about an American Poet traveling through Europe.
 

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User Review  - fieldnotes - LibraryThing

The imagists are strongest when observing, describing and imbuing what they see with brief solitary externalizations. They were a hit or miss batch of poets. One must sift through pages of their verse ... Read full review

Contents

Outward Bound
3
Paris Again
13
Looking About
17
Sis
26
The Supper
38
Carcassone
46
Marseilles
56
The Riveria
61
The Doctors
147
Routine
154
First Week
160
Old Vienna 66
166
Bach
174
A New Place to Meet
181
Schonbrunn 86
186
The New Room
191

The Villa St Denis
66
First Days
69
Certain Days
73
The Last Night at Villefranche
80
AT THE ANCIENT SPRINGS OF PURITY AND OF PLENTY
83
Through to Italy
85
Night
87
The Arno
95
Florence
100
To Rome
106
In Rome
108
South to Naples and Return
119
Venice and Northward
128
Vienna
139
Reitschule
196
Walkiire
201
Prater
209
Goodby Vienna
215
The Mountains
221
Lucerne and Interlaken
227
Geneva and Dijon
232
Paris Once More
239
Seine Sister
244
Cherbourg
253
APPENDIX
257
The Venus
259
Copyright

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About the author (1970)

Poet, artist, and practicing physician of Rutherford, New Jersey, William Carlos Williams wrote poetry that was experimental in form, ranging from imagism to objectivism, with great originality of idiom and human vitality. Credited with changing and directing American poetry toward a new metric and language, he also wrote a large number of short stories and novels. Paterson (1946--58), about the New Jersey city of that name, was his epic and places him with Ezra Pound of the Cantos as one of the great shapers of the long poem in this century. National recognition did not come early, but eventually Williams received many honors, including a vice-presidency of the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1952); the Bollingen Prize (1953); the $5,000 fellowship of the Academy of American Poets; the Loines Award for poetry of the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1948); and the Brandeis Award (1957). Book II of Paterson received the first National Book Award for poetry in 1949. Williams was named consultant in poetry in English to the Library of Congress for 1952--53. Williams's continuously inventive style anchored not only objectivism, the school to which he most properly belongs, but also a long line of subsequent poets as various as Robert Lowell, Frank O'Hara, and Allen Ginsberg. With Stevens, he forms one of the most important sources of a specifically American tradition of modernism. In addition to his earlier honors, Williams received two important awards posthumously, the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry (1963) and the Gold Medal for Poetry from the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1963).

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