Travels in the Interior of Southern Africa,: Volume I. With an entirely new map, and numerous engravings..

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Paternoster-Row., 1824 - Africa, Southern
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This is volume II, not volume I as indicated. Volume I could not be found.

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Page 191 - ... in his face, without the least appearance of fear. The lion, conscious of his strength, remained unmoved at their noisy attempts, and kept his head turned towards us. At one moment, the dogs perceiving his eyes thus engaged, had advanced close to his feet, and seemed as if they would actually seize hold of him, but they paid dearly for their imprudence, for, without discomposing the majestic and steady attitude in which he stood fixed, he merely moved his paw, and at the next instant I beheld...
Page 192 - At the time when men first adopted the lion as the emblem of courage, it would seem that they regarded great size and strength as indicating it ; but they were greatly mistaken in the character they have given to this indolent, skulking animal, and have overlooked a much better example of true courage, and of other virtues also, in the bold and faithful dog.
Page 192 - Of the courage of a lion I have no very high opinion, but of his majestic air and movements, as exhibited by this animal, while at liberty in his native plains, I can bear testimony. Notwithstanding the pain of a wound, of which he must soon afterwards have died, he moved slowly away with a stately and measured step.
Page 192 - I had hoped in a few minutes to have been enabled to take hold of his paw without danger. " This was considered, by our party, to be a lion of the largest size, and seemed, as I measured him by comparison with the dogs, to be, though less bulky, as large as an ox. He was certainly as long in body, though lower in stature ; and his copious mane gave him a truly formidable appearance. He was of that variety which the Hottentots and boors distinguish by the name of the black lion, on account of the...
Page 59 - When it happens, which is not often the case, that a girl has grown up to womanhood without having previously been betrothed, her lover must gain her own approbation, as well as that of...
Page 243 - ... to mankind. When wandering over pathless deserts, oppressed With vexation and distress at the conduct of my own men, I have turned to these as my only friends, and felt how much inferior to them was man when actuated only by selfish views.
Page 109 - Africa ; and it ii certainly one of the most numerous. The plain afforded no other object to fix the attention ; and even if it had presented many, I should not readily have ceased admiring these elegant animals, or have been diverted from watching their manners. It was only occasionally that they took those remarkable leaps, which have been the origin of the name; but when grazing, or moving at leisure, they walked or trotted like other antelopes, or as the common deer. When pursued, or hastening...
Page 242 - ... and others for their courage in holding ferocious animals at bay. So large a pack was not, indeed, maintained without adding greatly to our care and trouble, in supplying them with meat and water ; for it was sometimes difficult to procure for them enough of the latter ; but their services were invaluable, often contributing to our safety, and always to our ease, by their constant vigilance ; as we felt a confidence that no danger could approach us at night without it being announced by their...
Page 81 - ... when the people began to unearth the bees, I did not expect that we should escape without being severely stung. But they knew so well how to manage an affair of this kind, that they robbed the poor insects with the greatest ease and safety. Before they commenced digging a fire was made near the hole...
Page 485 - The traveller Burchell rendered such a service to the Bachapins, a tribe of the interior of Southern Africa. He gave to their chief a bag of fresh peach stones, in quantity about a quart ; " nor did I fail," says the benevolent visitor of these poor people, " to impress on his mind a just idea of their value and nature, by telling him that they would produce trees which would continue every year to yield, without further trouble, abundance of large fruit of a more agreeable flavour than any which...

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